plebiscite

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Related to Plebiscites: referenda

pleb·i·scite

 (plĕb′ĭ-sīt′, -sĭt)
n.
1. A direct vote in which the entire electorate is invited to accept or refuse a proposal: The new constitution was ratified in a plebiscite.
2. A vote in which a population exercises the right of national self-determination.

[French plébiscite, from Latin plēbiscītum : plēbis, genitive of plēbs, the people; see pelə- in Indo-European roots + scītum, decree, from neuter past participle of scīscere, to vote for, inchoative of scīre, to know; see skei- in Indo-European roots.]

ple·bis′ci·tar′y (plə-bĭs′ĭ-tĕr′ē, plĕb′ĭ-sĭt′ə-rē) adj.

plebiscite

(ˈplɛbɪˌsaɪt; -sɪt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a direct vote by the electorate of a state, region, etc, on some question of usually national importance, such as union with another state or acceptance of a government programme
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any expression or determination of public opinion on some matter
[C16: from Old French plēbiscite, from Latin plēbiscītum decree of the people, from plēbs the populace + scītum, from scīscere to decree, approve, from scīre to know]
plebiscitary adj

pleb•i•scite

(ˈplɛb əˌsaɪt, -sɪt)

n.
1. a direct vote of the qualified voters of a state in regard to some important public question.
2. the vote by which the people of a political unit determine autonomy or affiliation with another country.
[1525–35; < French < Latin plēbīscītum decree of the plebs =plēbī (for plēbis, plēbēī genitive singular of plēbs, plēbēs plebs) + scītum resolution, decree, neuter past participle of scīscere to enact, decree, orig., to seek to know, inchoative of scīre to know]

plebiscite

A vote in which the whole electorate is asked to decide on a particular issue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plebiscite - a vote by the electorate determining public opinion on a question of national importance
vote - the opinion of a group as determined by voting; "they put the question to a vote"

plebiscite

noun vote, poll, referendum, ballot The future of the country should be decided by plebiscite.
Translations

plebiscite

[ˈplebɪsɪt] Nplebiscito m

plebiscite

[ˈplɛbɪsɪt] nplébiscite m

plebiscite

nPlebiszit nt, → Volksentscheid m

plebiscite

[ˈplɛbɪsɪt] nplebiscito
to hold a plebiscite → fare un referendum
References in classic literature ?
My friend was scornful, and I bribed him to mention the plebiscite to no one, but secretly I was elated and amazed.
According to a new opinion poll, a majority of Taiwanese say recent changes to the Referendum Act allow plebiscites about Taiwan's independence or unification with China and about the drawing up of a new Constitution.
If you review the turnout in plebiscites, whether on whole constitutions or amendments, turnout has been, historically, low.
There have only been three plebiscites in Australian history, two relating to conscription during World War I, and one to choose a national song in 1977.
Speaking at an international event on the sideline of the 35th session of Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in Geneva, the author of several books and papers on Kashmir conflict, Schofield said, 'If holding a plebiscite across the entire state of Jammu and Kashmir is a problem, the UN could instead go for holding regional plebiscites, which means UN-supervised referendums in each region of the state.
Today, Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine will hold plebiscites to determine whether the regions of Donetsk and Lughansk should remain part of the Ukraine or should become independent and autonomous republics.
Despite their promise of a democratic solution to territorial disputes, plebiscites have a poor record of resolving ethnic conflicts.
Quebec, the only Canadian province with a French-speaking majority, held two plebiscites on independence, in 1980 and 1995, narrowly voting to remain a part of Canada.
Vinicio Lopez of the Movimiento de Trabajadores Campesinos (MTC) said that, although the plebiscites have been ignored, the issues of mining and of popular sovereignty are now firmly part of the national political agenda and will be key issues in the 2007 general elections.
7 by Iwakuni Mayor Katsusuke Ihara, will be nonbinding but a city ordinance requires the mayor and the city assembly to respect the outcome of plebiscites.
In May 1945, Winston Churchill proposed a referendum to continue the war-time Coalition Government, but Clement Attlee refused, preferring a general election because he associated a referendum with the plebiscites held by Hitler and plebiscites held by Mussolini as an undemocratic method of gaining public opinion.
Malcom Crook examines public participation and engagement in plebiscites and contrasts relatively high levels of participation in southwest and eastern France with low turnouts in the west, especially the commercial seaports which were devastated by the war.