Pleiades


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Ple·ia·des

 (plē′ə-dēz′, plī′-)
pl.n.
1. Greek Mythology The seven daughters of Atlas (Maia, Electra, Celaeno, Taygeta, Merope, Alcyone, and Sterope), who were metamorphosed into stars.
2. An open star cluster in the constellation Taurus, consisting of several hundred stars, of which six are visible to the naked eye and located approximately 430 light years from Earth.

[Middle English Pliades, from Latin Plēïades, from Greek Plēiades.]

Pleiades

(ˈplaɪəˌdiːz)
pl n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth the seven daughters of Atlas, placed as stars in the sky either to save them from the pursuit of Orion or, in another account, after they had killed themselves for grief over the death of their half-sisters the Hyades

Pleiades

(ˈplaɪəˌdiːz)
pl n
(Celestial Objects) a young conspicuous open star cluster approximately 370 light years away in the constellation Taurus, containing several thousand stars only six or seven of which are visible to the naked eye. Compare Hyades1

Ple•ia•des

(ˈpli əˌdiz, ˈplaɪ-)

n.pl.
1. (in Greek myth) seven daughters of Atlas placed among the stars by the gods to save them from the pursuit of Orion.
2. a conspicuous group of stars in the constellation Taurus, commonly spoken of as seven, though only six are visible.
[1350–1400; Middle English Pliades < Latin Plīades < Greek Pleíades (singular Pleías)]

Ple·ia·des

(plē′ə-dēz′)
A loose collection of several hundred stars in the constellation Taurus, at least six of which are visible to the unaided eye.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pleiades - (Greek mythology) 7 daughters of Atlas and half-sisters of the HyadesPleiades - (Greek mythology) 7 daughters of Atlas and half-sisters of the Hyades; placed among the stars to save them from the pursuit of Orion
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
nymph - (classical mythology) a minor nature goddess usually depicted as a beautiful maiden; "the ancient Greeks believed that nymphs inhabited forests and bodies of water"
Asterope, Sterope - (Greek mythology) one of the 7 Pleiades
2.Pleiades - a star cluster in the constellation Taurus
Asterope, Sterope - one of the stars in the star cluster Pleiades
Taurus - a zodiacal constellation in the northern hemisphere near Orion; between Aries and Gemini
Translations
Plejaden
PlejaditSeulaset
Plêiades

Pleiades

[ˈplaɪədiːz] NPLPléyades fpl

Pleiades

plPlejaden pl
References in classic literature ?
Such occasions, however, rarely occur and are perhaps not characteristic of Hesiod's genius: if we would see Hesiod at his best, in his most natural vein, we must turn to such a passage as that which he himself -- according to the compiler of the "Contest of Hesiod and Homer" -- selected as best in all his work, `When the Pleiades, Atlas' daughters, begin to rise.
Very similar is his reference to seasons through what happens or is done in that season: `when the House- carrier, fleeing the Pleiades, climbs up the plants from the earth', is the season for harvesting; or `when the artichoke flowers and the clicking grass-hopper, seated in a tree, pours down his shrill song', is the time for rest.
He enjoyed, in common with Moestlin, Kepler's professor, the rare faculty of distinguishing the satellites of Jupiter with the naked eye, and of counting fourteen of the stars in the group of Pleiades, the remotest of them being only of the ninth magnitude.
Then he learned that one other spirit had trembled with the same touch of wonder: that at his side, living under his roof and eating his bread, was a creature to whom he could say: "That's Orion down yonder; the big fellow to the right is Aldebaran, and the bunch of little ones-like bees swarming-they're the Pleiades.
If it were worth the while to settle in those parts near to the Pleiades or the Hyades, to Aldebaran or Altair, then I was really there, or at an equal remoteness from the life which I had left behind, dwindled and twinkling with as fine a ray to my nearest neighbor, and to be seen only in moonless nights by him.
First in his East the glorious Lamp was seen, Regent of Day, and all th' Horizon round Invested with bright Rayes, jocond to run His Longitude through Heav'ns high rode: the gray Dawn, and the PLEIADES before him danc'd Shedding sweet influence: less bright the Moon, But opposite in leveld West was set His mirror, with full face borrowing her Light From him, for other light she needed none In that aspect, and still that distance keepes Till night, then in the East her turn she shines, Revolvd on Heav'ns great Axle, and her Reign With thousand lesser Lights dividual holds, With thousand thousand Starres, that then appeer'd Spangling the Hemisphere: then first adornd With thir bright Luminaries that Set and Rose, Glad Eevning & glad Morn crownd the fourth day.
But not anymore: Publishing in the November issue of The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Timothy White (Aarhus University, Denmark) and colleagues tried out an innovative new technique known as halo photometry on Kepler observations of the brilliant "Seven Sisters" of the Pleiades.
Like far angels, stars come out, The Pleiades and Plough, How do things stand between us And the Almighty now?
Pleiades kept his momentum going as the Galileo colt picked up his second straight victory and third straight finish in the frame this year.
It is also noted that in tankers, although contracted before the end of last year, it has been reported this week that Clients of Pleiades Shipping Agents have placed an order for two firm plus two optional 50,000 DWT MR Tankers at Hyundai Mipo Dockyard.
One controversy that astronomers are eager to resolve with Gaia is the distance to the Pleiades star cluster, one of the closest repositories of youthful stars.