Pliny


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Pliny: Pliny the Younger

Plin·y

 (plĭn′ē) Originally Gaius Plinius Secundus. Known as "the Elder." ad 23-79.
Roman scholar and naturalist. He wrote the 37-volume Historia Naturalis. His nephew Pliny (originally Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus, ad 62?-113?), known as "the Younger," was a consul and writer whose letters provide valuable information about Roman life.

Pliny

(ˈplɪnɪ)
n
1. (Biography) known as Pliny the Elder. Latin name Gaius Plinius Secundus. 23–79 ad, Roman writer, the author of the encyclopedic Natural History (77)
2. (Biography) his nephew, known as Pliny the Younger. Latin name Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus. ?62–?113 ad, Roman writer and administrator, noted for his letters

Plin•y

(ˈplɪn i)

n.
1. ( “the Elder,” Gaius Plinius Secundus) A.D. 23–79, Roman naturalist and writer.
2. his nephew ( “the Younger,” Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus) A.D. 62?–c113, Roman writer and orator.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pliny - Roman writer and nephew of Pliny the ElderPliny - Roman writer and nephew of Pliny the Elder; author of books of letters that commented on affairs of the day (62-113)
2.Pliny - Roman author of an encyclopedic natural history; died while observing the eruption of Vesuvius (23-79)
Translations

Pliny

[ˈplɪnɪ] NPlinio
Pliny the ElderPlinio el Viejo
Pliny the YoungerPlinio el Joven

Pliny

[ˈplɪnɪ] n Pliny the Younger/the ElderPlinio il Giovane/il Vecchio
References in classic literature ?
For Pliny tells us of whales that embraced acres of living bulk, and Aldrovandus of others which measured eight hundred feet in length --Rope Walks and Thames Tunnels of Whales
And if ever I go where Pliny is, I, a whaleman (more than he was), will make bold to tell him so.
Already, in the nineteenth year of our era, according to Cassiodorus and Pliny, a new island, Theia
In ten minutes after the strangers had departed, Franz was on the road to the Piazza de Spagni, listening with studied indifference to the learned dissertation delivered by Albert, after the manner of Pliny and Calpurnius, touching the iron-pointed nets used to prevent the ferocious beasts from springing on the spectators.
For saith Pliny, very wittily, In commending another, you do yourself right; for he that you commend, is either superior to you in that you commend, or inferior.
Every body has written about the Grotto del Cane and its poisonous vapors, from Pliny down to Smith, and every tourist has held a dog over its floor by the legs to test the capabilities of the place.
You are a very good lawyer, but you are a poor historian, you know nothing of sociology, and your biology is contemporaneous with Pliny.
In the time of the Romans, as we hear from Pliny, immense prices were given for pigeons; 'nay, they are come to this pass, that they can reckon up their pedigree and race.
Savages now sometimes cross their dogs with wild canine animals, to improve the breed, and they formerly did so, as is attested by passages in Pliny.
Others of Lyly's affectations are rhetorical questions, hosts of allusions to classical history, and literature, and an unfailing succession of similes from all the recondite knowledge that he can command, especially from the fantastic collection of fables which, coming down through the Middle Ages from the Roman writer Pliny, went at that time by the name of natural history and which we have already encountered in the medieval Bestiaries.
He was succeeded by Pliny, who also fell a victim to his thirst for knowledge.
A catastrophe which destroyed the loveliest regions of the earth, a fate shared by whole cities and their people, and one so memorable' --so begins the first of the two celebrated letters written by Pliny the Younger to the historian Tacitus in the 1st century AD, recording the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD and the obliteration of Pompeii and Herculaneum.