plosive

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plo·sive

 (plō′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a speech sound produced by complete closure of the oral passage and subsequent release accompanied by a burst of air, as in the sound (p) in pit or (d) in dog.
n.
A plosive speech sound.

[From explosive.]

plosive

(ˈpləʊsɪv) phonetics
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) articulated with or accompanied by plosion
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a plosive consonant; stop
[C20: from French, from explosif explosive]

plo•sive

(ˈploʊ sɪv)
adj.
1. of or pertaining to a consonant characterized by momentary complete closure at some part of the vocal tract causing stoppage of the flow of air, followed by sudden release of the compressed air.
n.
2. a plosive consonant, as (p) or (d); stop.
[1895–1900; shortening of explosive]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plosive - a consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it; "his stop consonants are too aspirated"
obstruent - a consonant that is produced with a partial or complete blockage of the airflow from the lungs through the nose or mouth
implosion - the initial occluded phase of a stop consonant
plosion, explosion - the terminal forced release of pressure built up during the occlusive phase of a stop consonant
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
glottal catch, glottal plosive, glottal stop - a stop consonant articulated by releasing pressure at the glottis; as in the sudden onset of a vowel
suction stop, click - a stop consonant made by the suction of air into the mouth (as in Bantu)
Translations
explozivaokluziva
eksplozivzapornik
klusil

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv]
A. ADJexplosivo
B. Nexplosiva f

plosive

adjVerschluss-, explosiv; plosive soundVerschlusslaut m
nVerschlusslaut m, → Explosivlaut m, → Explosivum nt (spec)

plosive

[ˈpləʊsɪv] (Phonetics)
1. adjocclusivo/a
2. nocclusiva
References in periodicals archive ?
The voiced fricatives, such as /v/and /z/and voiced plosives like /b/and /d/might be the best compromise.
The remaining Spanish consonant phonemes are the voiceless plosives /p/, /t/ and /k/, the laterals /l/ and /y/, the tap /r/, the trill /r/, the affricate /tf/, and the voiced fricative /[?
In addition, there is a majority of voiceless plosives that receive aspiration in the appropriate phonetic contexts.
Geminate plosives and fricatives occur in Luganda, as shown by Mutaka & Tamanji (2000).
Romero and Riera's chapter 4 revisits the phonetic and phonological voicing of plosives, emphasising the spatiotemporal aspect of the phenomenon and its relationship with stress, illustrated by copious examples from English.
The quality of articulation of all plosives was statistically much better in the first graders than in the pre-school children, p<001.
Reducing a little bit more the scope of the phenomenon, Britto Leite assumes a variationist look at rhotic phonemes in the language spoken in Campinas, while Adam & Zimmer postulate a dynamic conception of L2 acquisition, evaluating Brazilian children's perception and production of standards of Voice Onset Time for initial plosives in English.
as dental or alveolar plosives, is common in Shetland (where du is used as the familiar form of address), but it can also be found in Orkney, albeit to a lesser degree.
Surprisingly, he presents plosives followed by nasals as a type of common syllable employed by "ancient" (prisci) poets, thereby expanding Bede's dichotomy of old and new practices:
This is a study of voicing onset time for Pashto (L1) and English (L2) plosives with focus on acquisition of English plosives by adult Pashtoon learners.
However unlike Dutch there are not only /s/ but also plosives nasals and fricatives can be preceded by obstruent and liquids in Hindko.