plurality

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Related to Plurality System: proportional representation

plu·ral·i·ty

 (plo͝o-răl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. plu·ral·i·ties
1. The state or fact of being plural.
2. A large number or amount; a multitude.
3. Ecclesiastical
a. Pluralism.
b. The offices or benefices held by a pluralist.
4.
a. In a contest of more than two choices, the number of votes cast for the winning choice if this number is not more than one half of the total votes cast.
b. The number by which the vote of the winning choice in such a contest exceeds that of the closest opponent.
5. The larger or greater part.

plurality

(plʊəˈrælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state of being plural or numerous
2. (Mathematics) maths a number greater than one
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) US and Canadian the excess of votes or seats won by the winner of an election over the runner-up when no candidate or party has more than 50 per cent. British equivalent: relative majority
4. a large number
5. the greater number; majority
6. (Ecclesiastical Terms) another word for pluralism1

plu•ral•i•ty

(plʊˈræl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. (in an election involving three or more candidates) the excess of votes received by the leading candidate over those received by the next candidate (disting. from majority).
2. more than half of the whole; the majority.
3. a number greater than one.
4. the fact of being numerous.
5. a large number; multitude.
6. the state or fact of being plural.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plurality - the state of being plural; "to mark plurality, one language may add an extra syllable to the word whereas another may simply change the vowel in the existing final syllable"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
2.plurality - a large indefinite numberplurality - a large indefinite number; "a battalion of ants"; "a multitude of TV antennas"; "a plurality of religions"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
3.plurality - (in an election with more than 2 options) the number of votes for the candidate or party receiving the greatest number (but less that half of the votes)
election - a vote to select the winner of a position or political office; "the results of the election will be announced tonight"
relative quantity - a quantity relative to some purpose

plurality

noun multiplicity, variety, diversity, profusion, numerousness Federalism implies a plurality of political authorities.
Translations

plurality

[ˌplʊəˈrælɪtɪ] Npluralidad f
by a plurality of votespor mayoría (simple) de votos

plurality

n
Vielfalt f, → Mannigfaltigkeit f; (Sociol) → Pluralität f
(US Pol) → (Stimmen)vorsprung m
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus it seems that Canadian voters prefer to keep the plurality system with geographically defined single-member constituencies.
Dr Mohamed Aboul Ghar, Egyptian Social Democratic Party (ESDP) head and constituent assembly member, told Ahmed El-Moslimany, media adviser to the interim president, that holding parliamentary elections with single-member plurality system is a "disaster threatening the future of Egypt after the revolution", according to the press release issued by Aboul Ghar after his party's leaders met with El-Moslimany.
Canada uses a plurality system otherwise known as first-past-the-post.
Members of both houses are elected using a plurality system with single member districts (First Past the Post or FPTP).
While smaller parties can hope to gain some representation from the list seats, overall levels of proportionality in such systems are more like those of a plurality system than a proportional one.
Which is why our "first past the post" electoral system is called a plurality system.
The proposal sought to change the voting standard to elect directors to the board from the current plurality system to a majority vote system.
But the basic formula by which our elections are run--the so-called single-member plurality system (generally called "first past the post") inherited from the British, in which each constituency sends to Parliament the candidate who gets a simple majority of the votes--has scarcely changed at all.
As a result, under a plurality system a slate of directors will be re-elected no matter how little support they receive--so long as the election is not contested, or, if contested, so long as they garner more votes than the contenders.
As McGurn explains it, under the current plurality system, if a quorum is represented at an annual meeting and a director is running unopposed, he or she needs only one affirmative vote.
Unlike these procedures, the plurality system looks only at a voter's top choice.
For this reason, our current plurality system tends to suppress third party candidacies and the voter participation they could generate.