Plutarch


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Plu·tarch

 (plo͞o′tärk′) Originally Mestrius Plutarchus. ad 46?-120?
Greek biographer and philosopher. He wrote Parallel Lives, a collection of paired biographies of famous Greek and Roman figures that Shakespeare used as source material for his Roman plays.

Plu·tarch′an (-tär′kən), Plu·tarch′i·an (-tär′kē-ən) adj.

Plutarch

(ˈpluːtɑːk)
n
(Biography) ?46–?120 ad, Greek biographer and philosopher, noted for his Parallel Lives of distinguished Greeks and Romans

Plu•tarch

(ˈplu tɑrk)

n.
A.D. c46–c120, Greek biographer.
Plu•tarch′i•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)
Translations
Plutarch
Plutarque
플루타르크
Plutarch

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] NPlutarco

Plutarch

nPlutarch m

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] nPlutarco
References in classic literature ?
And Solon, according to Plutarch, was in a manner compelled, by the universal suffrage of his fellow-citizens, to take upon him the sole and absolute power of new-modeling the constitution.
I read Plutarch, and Shakespeare, and Don Quixote by the sly, and supplied myself in that way with wandering thoughts, while my tutor was assuring me that "an improved man, as distinguished from an ignorant one, was a man who knew the reason why water ran downhill.
This put me a little out, but I began to make other inquiries in regard to his astronomical knowledge, when a member of the company, who had never as yet opened his mouth, whispered in my ear, that for information on this head, I had better consult Ptolemy (whoever Ptolemy is), as well as one Plutarch de facie lunae.
saith he) I had rather a great deal, men should say, there was no such man at all, as Plutarch, than that they should say, that there was one Plutarch, that would eat his children as soon as they were born; as the poets speak of Saturn.
But the highest minds of the world have never ceased to explore the double meaning, or shall I say the quadruple or the centuple or much more manifold meaning, of every sensuous fact; Orpheus, Empedocles, Heraclitus, Plato, Plutarch, Dante, Swedenborg, and the masters of sculpture, picture, and poetry.
Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
But when Mary wrote a little book for her boys, called "Stories of Great Men, taken from Plutarch," and had it printed and published by Gripp & Co.
Critics from Plutarch downwards have almost unanimously rejected the lines 654-662, on the ground that Hesiod's Amphidamas is the hero of the Lelantine Wars between Chalcis and Eretria, whose death may be placed circa 705 B.
Still, men of great intelligence, such as Plutarch, Swedenborg, Bernardin de St.
Scarcely a fault is his other Elizabethan habit of seldom, perhaps never, inventing the whole of his stories, but drawing the outlines of them from previous works--English chronicles, poems, or plays, Italian 'novels,' or the biographies of Plutarch.
We have the civil history of that people, as Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, and Plutarch have given it; a very sufficient account of what manner of persons they were and what they did.
I learned from Werter's imaginations despondency and gloom, but Plutarch taught me high thoughts; he elevated me above the wretched sphere of my own reflections, to admire and love the heroes of past ages.