Plutarch

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Plu·tarch

 (plo͞o′tärk′) Originally Mestrius Plutarchus. ad 46?-120?
Greek biographer and philosopher. He wrote Parallel Lives, a collection of paired biographies of famous Greek and Roman figures that Shakespeare used as source material for his Roman plays.

Plu·tarch′an (-tär′kən), Plu·tarch′i·an (-tär′kē-ən) adj.

Plutarch

(ˈpluːtɑːk)
n
(Biography) ?46–?120 ad, Greek biographer and philosopher, noted for his Parallel Lives of distinguished Greeks and Romans

Plu•tarch

(ˈplu tɑrk)

n.
A.D. c46–c120, Greek biographer.
Plu•tarch′i•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)
Translations
Plutarch
Plutarque
플루타르크
Plutarch

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] NPlutarco

Plutarch

nPlutarch m

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] nPlutarco
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps partly because animals were seen to be exemplars of health in the Plutarchan tradition, possessing a kind of natural medicine in their bodies, they came to represent a medical resource, what twenty-first-century terminology calls pharmazooticals, that is, medicine derived from animal bodies.
The Lavinia in this story is, however, vaguely analogous to Artemisia, insofar as there is a shred of evidence placing her definitively on the map of Plutarchan history of people and events.
Virtues for the people; aspects of Plutarchan ethics.
The Platonic and Plutarchan backgrounds, then, shed significant light on Apuleius' satirical self-fashioning in the role of Lucius.
But as Caracalla and Domitian were parallel tyrants, (40) the plays, looked at side-by-side, appear as parallel lives in the Plutarchan sense: biographies of persons so similar that it is instructive to note their differences.
In context with Ovid, and with the Plutarchan and Apuleian versions of Isiac myth, Britomart's accumulation of creative power at the Church of Isis in canto 7 illustrates Spenser's "metamorphoses" in his representation of the sexual origins of generation.
On the importance of reading the Lives in pairs, see Duff: "no one Life can be understood without its partner, and without the other components--prologue and comparison--which go to make up a whole Plutarchan 'book.