Pluto


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Related to Pluto: pluton, Planets, solar system, New Horizons

Plu·to

 (plo͞o′tō)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The god of the dead and the ruler of the underworld, identified with the Greek Hades.
2. A dwarf planet having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 248.5 years, a highly elliptical orbit with a perihelion distance of 4.4 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles) and an aphelion distance of 7.4 billion kilometers (4.6 billion miles), and a mean equatorial diameter of 2,302 kilometers (1,485 miles), less than half that of Earth. Until 2006, Pluto was classified as the ninth planet in the solar system. See Usage Note at planet.

[Latin Plūtō, Plūtōn-, from Greek Ploutōn, from ploutos, wealth (from the belief that the underworld was the source of wealth from the ground); see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the god of the underworld; Hades

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Celestial Objects) the second-largest dwarf planet in the solar system, located in the Kuiper belt; discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh (1906–97); classified as a planet until 2006, when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet. It has a diameter of 2390 km
vb (tr)
1. to reduce (something) in status or importance
2. to put an end to (something)
[Latin, from Greek Ploutōn, literally: the rich one]

PLUTO

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) the code name of pipelines laid under the English Channel to supply fuel to the Allied forces landing in Normandy in 1944
[C20: from p(ipe)l(ine) u(nder) t(he) o(cean)]

Plu•to

(ˈplu toʊ)

n.
2. the planet ninth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of about 1400 mi. (2250 km), a mean distance from the sun of 3.674 billion mi. (5.914 billion km), a period of revolution of 248.53 years, and one known moon.

Plu·to

(plo͞o′tō)
A dwarf planet that until 2006 was classified as the ninth planet in our solar system. It has a diameter about one-sixth that of Earth. It orbits the sun once every 248 years. Its orbit crosses that of Neptune. It has an average surface temperature of -369°F (-223°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pluto - a cartoon character created by Walt DisneyPluto - a cartoon character created by Walt Disney
2.Pluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythologyPluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythology; brother of Zeus and husband of Persephone
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
3.Pluto - a small planet and the farthest known planet from the sun; it has the most elliptical orbit of all the planets; "Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
Translations
Pluto
Pluto
Pluuto
Pluto
PlutoPluton
Pluto
HadPluton
Pluto
Diêm Vương Tinh

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] N (Astron, Myth) → Plutón m

Pluto

n (Myth) → Pluto m, → Pluton m; (Astron) → Pluto m

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] n (Astron, Myth) → Plutone m
References in classic literature ?
The Mediterranean, the blue sea par excellence, "the great sea" of the Hebrews, "the sea" of the Greeks, the "mare nostrum" of the Romans, bordered by orange-trees, aloes, cacti, and sea-pines; embalmed with the perfume of the myrtle, surrounded by rude mountains, saturated with pure and transparent air, but incessantly worked by underground fires; a perfect battlefield in which Neptune and Pluto still dispute the empire of the world!
My home is better than your mother's," answered King Pluto.
But King Pluto, as he called himself, only shouted to his steeds to go faster.
But she might just as well have talked to the wind that whistled past them, for Pluto urged on his horses, and went faster than ever.
and at length even Pluto, who was now becoming old, and consequently somewhat peevish - even Pluto began to experience the effects of my ill temper.
Pluto had not a white hair upon any portion of his body; but this cat had a large, although indefinite splotch of white, covering nearly the whole region of the breast.
What added, no doubt, to my hatred of the beast, was the discovery, on the morning after I brought it home, that, like Pluto, it also had been deprived of one of its eyes.
For the helmet of Pluto, which maketh the politic man go invisible, is secrecy in the counsel, and celerity in the execution.
For the Universe has three children, born at one time, which reappear under different names in every system of thought, whether they be called cause, operation, and effect; or, more poetically, Jove, Pluto, Neptune; or, theologically, the Father, the Spirit, and the Son; but which we will call here the Knower, the Doer, and the Sayer.
15) who with the lord Apollo and the Rivers have youths in their keeping -- to this charge Zeus appointed them -- Peitho, and Admete, and Ianthe, and Electra, and Doris, and Prymno, and Urania divine in form, Hippo, Clymene, Rhodea, and Callirrhoe, Zeuxo and Clytie, and Idyia, and Pasithoe, Plexaura, and Galaxaura, and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe and handsome Polydora, Cerceis lovely of form, and soft eyed Pluto, Perseis, Ianeira, Acaste, Xanthe, Petraea the fair, Menestho, and Europa, Metis, and Eurynome, and Telesto saffron-clad, Chryseis and Asia and charming Calypso, Eudora, and Tyche, Amphirho, and Ocyrrhoe, and Styx who is the chiefest of them all.
This hole was the "Black Lake"; it was Pluto, a deep circle which can be conveniently studied from the earth, between the last quarter and the new moon, when the shadows fall from west to east.
We must also expunge the verse, which tells us how Pluto feared, Lest the mansions grim and squalid which the gods abhor should he seen both of mortals and immortals.