Poe


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POE

abbr.
1. port of embarkation
2. port of entry

Poe

(pəʊ)
n
(Biography) Edgar Allan. 1809–49, US short-story writer, poet, and critic. Most of his short stories, such as The Fall of the House of Usher (1839) and the Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (1840), are about death, decay, and madness. The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1841) is regarded as the first modern detective story

POE

abbreviation for
1. (Military) military port of embarkation
2. port of entry

Poe

(poʊ)

n.
Edgar Allan, 1809–49, U.S. short-story writer and poet.

POE

1. port of embarkation.
2. port of entry.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Poe - United States writer and poet (1809-1849)Poe - United States writer and poet (1809-1849)
Translations

POE

[ˌpiːəʊˈiː] n abbr
(=port of embarkation) → port m d'embarquement
(=port of entry) → port m de débarquement
References in classic literature ?
I am a good swimmer (though without pretending to rival Byron or Edgar Poe, who were masters of the art), and in that plunge I did not lose my presence of mind.
THIS stanza from "The Raven" was recommended by James Russell Lowell as an inscription upon the Baltimore monument which marks the resting place of Edgar Allan Poe, the most interesting and original figure in American letters.
Born in poverty at Boston, January 19 1809, dying under painful circumstances at Baltimore, October 7, 1849, his whole literary career of scarcely fifteen years a pitiful struggle for mere subsistence, his memory malignantly misrepresented by his earliest biographer, Griswold, how completely has truth at last routed falsehood and how magnificently has Poe come into his own, For "The Raven," first published in 1845, and, within a few months, read, recited and parodied wherever the English language was spoken, the half-starved poet received $10
Tarr and Professor Fether"; such bits of extravaganza as "The Devil in the Belfry" and "The Angel of the Odd"; such tales of adventure as "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym"; such papers of keen criticism and review as won for Poe the enthusiastic admiration of Charles Dickens, although they made him many enemies among the over-puffed minor American writers so mercilessly exposed by him; such poems of beauty and melody as "The Bells," "The Haunted Palace," "Tamerlane," "The City in the Sea" and "The Raven.
No man," Poe himself wrote, "has recorded, no man has dared to record, the wonders of his inner life.
This struck from all three allusions to Edgar Poe and Jules Verne, and such platitudes as naturally rise to the lips of the most intelligent when they are talking against time, and dealing with a new invention in which it would seem ingenuous to believe too soon; and the question of the telephone carried them safely back to the big house.
As it has been well expressed in the paradox of Poe, wisdom should reckon on the unforeseen.
Edgar Allan Poe, in 'The Murders in the Rue Morgue,' invented nothing like it.
And there it was again, the division of labour, the special knowledge of the pilot and captain which permitted the stout gentleman to read my special knowledge on Poe while they carried him safely from Sausalito to San Francisco.
Poe, get the release papers, if you please"; and then he fell to writing again.
He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine.
These scenes were included, unaltered, in the 1845 collection of Poems, by Poe.