poem

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Related to Poems: Love poems

po·em

 (pō′əm)
n.
1. A verbal composition designed to convey experiences, ideas, or emotions in a vivid and imaginative way, characterized by the use of language chosen for its sound and suggestive power and by the use of literary techniques such as meter, metaphor, and rhyme.
2. A composition in verse rather than in prose: wrote both prose and poems.
3. A literary composition written with an intensity or beauty of language more characteristic of poetry than of prose.

[French poème, from Old French, from Latin poēma, from Greek poiēma, from poiein, to create; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

poem

(ˈpəʊɪm)
n
1. (Poetry) a composition in verse, usually characterized by concentrated and heightened language in which words are chosen for their sound and suggestive power as well as for their sense, and using such techniques as metre, rhyme, and alliteration
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a literary composition that is not in verse but exhibits the intensity of imagination and language common to it: a prose poem.
3. anything resembling a poem in beauty, effect, etc
[C16: from Latin poēma, from Greek, variant of poiēma something composed, created, from poiein to make]

po•em

(ˈpoʊ əm)

n.
1. a composition in verse, esp. one characterized by a highly developed form and the use of heightened language and rhythm to express an imaginative interpretation of the subject.
2. something having qualities that are suggestive of or likened to those of poetry.
[1540–50; < Latin poēma < Greek poíēma poem, something made =poiē-, variant s. of poieîn to make + -ma resultative n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical linespoem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
abecedarius - a poem having lines beginning with letters of the alphabet in regular order
Alcaic, Alcaic verse - verse in the meter used in Greek and Latin poetry consisting of strophes of 4 tetrametric lines; reputedly invented by Alcaeus
ballad, lay - a narrative poem of popular origin
ballade - a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
blank verse - unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)
elegy, lament - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
epic, epic poem, heroic poem, epos - a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
free verse, vers libre - unrhymed verse without a consistent metrical pattern
haiku - an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
rondel, rondeau - a French verse form of 10 or 13 lines running on two rhymes; the opening phrase is repeated as the refrain of the second and third stanzas
sonnet - a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
tanka - a form of Japanese poetry; the 1st and 3rd lines have five syllables and the 2nd, 4th, and 5th have seven syllables
terza rima - a verse form with a rhyme scheme: aba bcb cdc, etc.
rhyme, verse - a piece of poetry
canto - a major division of a long poem
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
versicle - a short verse said or sung by a priest or minister in public worship and followed by a response from the congregation
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)

poem

noun verse, song, lyric, rhyme, sonnet, ode, verse composition a tender autobiographical poem set to music
Quotations
"A poem should not mean"
"but be" [Archibald McLeish Ars Poetica]

poem

noun
1. A poetic work or poetic works:
2. Something likened to poetry, as in form or style:
Translations
قَصِّيدَةقَصيدَه
báseň
digt
runo
pjesmapoema
költeményvers
puisi
ljóðljóî
詩歌詩的表現
eilėraštispoema
dzejolispoēma
báseň
pesempoezija
diktpoem
บทกวี
bài thơ

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] N (short) → poesía f; (long, narrative) → poema m
Lorca's poemslas poesías de Lorca, la obra poética de Lorca

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoème m

poem

nGedicht nt; epic poemEpos nt

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoesia

poem

(ˈpouim) noun
a piece of writing arranged in lines which usually have a regular rhythm and often rhyme.

poem

قَصِّيدَة báseň digt Gedicht ποίημα poema runo poème pjesma poesia gedicht dikt wiersz poema поэма dikt บทกวี şiir bài thơ
References in classic literature ?
Jo" on the next lid, scratched and worn, And within a motley store Of headless, dolls, of schoolbooks torn, Birds and beasts that speak no more, Spoils brought home from the fairy ground Only trod by youthful feet, Dreams of a future never found, Memories of a past still sweet, Half-writ poems, stories wild, April letters, warm and cold, Diaries of a wilful child, Hints of a woman early old, A woman in a lonely home, Hearing, like a sad refrain-- "Be worthy, love, and love will come," In the falling summer rain.
1] This poem does not appear in the collected works of William Cullen Bryant, nor in the collected poems of his brother, John Howard Bryant.
If you would only live with me in some little house when we get older," mused Emma Jane, as with her darning needle poised in air she regarded the opposite wall dreamily, "I would do the housework and cooking, and copy all your poems and stories, and take them to the post-office, and you needn't do anything but write.
It seems to have been the original of other poems of the kind.
Erskine, who had presented him, a few days before, with a copy of "The Patriot Martyrs and other Poems," tried to catch a glimpse of the book over which Trefusis was so serious.
This large one here," said the barber, "is called 'The Treasury of various Poems.
Her movements succeeded each other with such airiness and grace that she seemed not a creature of this world but a daughter of the atmosphere, as sung in the poems of Ossian.
Every evening, after the company had left her, she thought of her lost youth, her faded bloom, the hopes of thwarted nature; and, all the while immolating her passions at the feet of the Cross (like poems condemned to stay in a desk), she resolved firmly that if, by chance, any suitor presented himself, to subject him to no tests, but to accept him at once for whatever he might be.
Hence, some say, the name of 'drama' is given to such poems, as representing action.
The poems of the T`angs are full of this subtle aroma, this suggestive compelling fragrance which lingers when the songs have passed away.
The characteristics of our romantic are to understand everything, to see everything and to see it often incomparably more clearly than our most realistic minds see it; to refuse to accept anyone or anything, but at the same time not to despise anything; to give way, to yield, from policy; never to lose sight of a useful practical object (such as rent-free quarters at the government expense, pensions, decorations), to keep their eye on that object through all the enthusiasms and volumes of lyrical poems, and at the same time to preserve "the sublime and the beautiful" inviolate within them to the hour of their death, and to preserve themselves also, incidentally, like some precious jewel wrapped in cotton wool if only for the benefit of "the sublime and the beautiful.
Here are forty double pistoles, my dear friend," said D'Artagnan, taking the sum from his pocket; "I know that is the coin in which you were paid for your poems.