poem

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Related to Poems: Love poems

po·em

 (pō′əm)
n.
1. A verbal composition designed to convey experiences, ideas, or emotions in a vivid and imaginative way, characterized by the use of language chosen for its sound and suggestive power and by the use of literary techniques such as meter, metaphor, and rhyme.
2. A composition in verse rather than in prose: wrote both prose and poems.
3. A literary composition written with an intensity or beauty of language more characteristic of poetry than of prose.

[French poème, from Old French, from Latin poēma, from Greek poiēma, from poiein, to create; see kwei- in Indo-European roots.]

poem

(ˈpəʊɪm)
n
1. (Poetry) a composition in verse, usually characterized by concentrated and heightened language in which words are chosen for their sound and suggestive power as well as for their sense, and using such techniques as metre, rhyme, and alliteration
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a literary composition that is not in verse but exhibits the intensity of imagination and language common to it: a prose poem.
3. anything resembling a poem in beauty, effect, etc
[C16: from Latin poēma, from Greek, variant of poiēma something composed, created, from poiein to make]

po•em

(ˈpoʊ əm)

n.
1. a composition in verse, esp. one characterized by a highly developed form and the use of heightened language and rhythm to express an imaginative interpretation of the subject.
2. something having qualities that are suggestive of or likened to those of poetry.
[1540–50; < Latin poēma < Greek poíēma poem, something made =poiē-, variant s. of poieîn to make + -ma resultative n. suffix]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical linespoem - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
line of poetry, line of verse - a single line of words in a poem
literary composition, literary work - imaginative or creative writing
abecedarius - a poem having lines beginning with letters of the alphabet in regular order
Alcaic, Alcaic verse - verse in the meter used in Greek and Latin poetry consisting of strophes of 4 tetrametric lines; reputedly invented by Alcaeus
ballad, lay - a narrative poem of popular origin
ballade - a poem consisting of 3 stanzas and an envoy
blank verse - unrhymed verse (usually in iambic pentameter)
elegy, lament - a mournful poem; a lament for the dead
epic, epic poem, heroic poem, epos - a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
free verse, vers libre - unrhymed verse without a consistent metrical pattern
haiku - an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
lyric poem, lyric - a short poem of songlike quality
rondel, rondeau - a French verse form of 10 or 13 lines running on two rhymes; the opening phrase is repeated as the refrain of the second and third stanzas
sonnet - a verse form consisting of 14 lines with a fixed rhyme scheme
tanka - a form of Japanese poetry; the 1st and 3rd lines have five syllables and the 2nd, 4th, and 5th have seven syllables
terza rima - a verse form with a rhyme scheme: aba bcb cdc, etc.
rhyme, verse - a piece of poetry
canto - a major division of a long poem
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
versicle - a short verse said or sung by a priest or minister in public worship and followed by a response from the congregation
stanza - a fixed number of lines of verse forming a unit of a poem
poetic rhythm, rhythmic pattern, prosody - (prosody) a system of versification
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)

poem

noun verse, song, lyric, rhyme, sonnet, ode, verse composition a tender autobiographical poem set to music
Quotations
"A poem should not mean"
"but be" [Archibald McLeish Ars Poetica]

poem

noun
1. A poetic work or poetic works:
2. Something likened to poetry, as in form or style:
Translations
قَصِّيدَةقَصيدَه
báseň
digt
runo
pjesmapoema
költeményvers
puisi
ljóðljóî
詩歌詩的表現
eilėraštispoema
dzejolispoēma
báseň
pesempoezija
diktpoem
บทกวี
bài thơ

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] N (short) → poesía f; (long, narrative) → poema m
Lorca's poemslas poesías de Lorca, la obra poética de Lorca

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoème m

poem

nGedicht nt; epic poemEpos nt

poem

[ˈpəʊɪm] npoesia

poem

(ˈpouim) noun
a piece of writing arranged in lines which usually have a regular rhythm and often rhyme.

poem

قَصِّيدَة báseň digt Gedicht ποίημα poema runo poème pjesma poesia gedicht dikt wiersz poema поэма dikt บทกวี şiir bài thơ
References in classic literature ?
While discussing, very much at random, the essentiality of what we call Poetry, my principal purpose will be to cite for consideration, some few of those minor English or American poems which best suit my own taste, or which, upon my own fancy, have left the most definite impression.
This great work, in fact, is to be regarded as poetical, only when, losing sight of that vital requisite in all works of Art, Unity, we view it merely as a series of minor poems.
The Hesiodic poems fall into two groups according as they are didactic (technical or gnomic) or genealogical: the first group centres round the "Works and Days", the second round the "Theogony".
At first sight such a work seems to be a miscellany of myths, technical advice, moral precepts, and folklore maxims without any unifying principle; and critics have readily taken the view that the whole is a canto of fragments or short poems worked up by a redactor.
with the perfectly sincere poems of the Greek Theocritus, who gives genuine expression to the life of actual Sicilian shepherds.
Spenser, however, soon outgrew this folly and in 1579 published the collection of poems which, as we have already said, is commonly taken as marking the beginning of the great Elizabethan literary period, namely 'The Shepherd's Calendar.
But as Ossian, if he ever lived, lived in the third century, as it is not probable that his poems were written down at the time, and as the oldest books that we have containing any of his poetry were written in the twelfth century, it is very difficult to be sure that he really made the poems called by his name.
All who read it were delighted with the poems, and said that if there was any more such poetry in the Highlands, it should be gathered together and printed before it was lost and forgotten for ever.
This condition will be satisfied by poems on a smaller scale than the old epics, and answering in length to the group of tragedies presented at a single sitting.
But in Epic poetry, owing to the narrative form, many events simultaneously transacted can be presented; and these, if relevant to the subject, add mass and dignity to the poem.
Going through its contents, he drew forth eleven poems which his friend had written.
There were certain outline illustrations in it, which were very good in the cold Flaxman manner, and helped largely to heighten the fascination of the poems for me.