pokeweed

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poke·weed

 (pōk′wēd′)
n.
Any of various tall herbaceous poisonous plants of the genus Phytolacca, especially P. americana of eastern North America, having reddish stems, elongated clusters of small white flowers, and dark purple berries. Also called inkberry, pokeberry, pokeroot.

[poke + weed.]

pokeweed

(ˈpəʊkˌwiːd) ,

pokeberry

or

pokeroot

n
(Plants) a tall North American plant, Phytolacca americana, that has small white flowers, juicy purple berries, and a poisonous purple root used medicinally: family Phytolaccaceae. Sometimes shortened to: poke Also called: inkberry
[C18 poke, shortened from Algonquian puccoon plant used in dyeing, from pak blood]

poke•weed

(ˈpoʊkˌwid)

n.
a North American treelike plant, Phytolacca americana, of the pokeweed family, with edible shoots and juicy deep-purple berries in depressed round clusters.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pokeweed - perennial of the genus Phytolaccapokeweed - perennial of the genus Phytolacca  
genus Phytolacca, Phytolacca - type genus of Phytolaccaceae: pokeweed
Phytolacca acinosa, Indian poke - pokeweed of southeastern Asia and China
garget, Phytolacca americana, pigeon berry, poke, scoke - tall coarse perennial American herb having small white flowers followed by blackish-red berries on long drooping racemes; young fleshy stems are edible; berries and root are poisonous
bella sombra, ombu, Phytolacca dioica - fast-growing herbaceous evergreen tree of South America having a broad trunk with high water content and dark green oval leaves
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Translations

pokeweed

n (US) → Kermesbeere f
References in periodicals archive ?
We usually do this unit in the fall when the plant materials such as black-eyed susans, red onions, yellow onions, walnuts, chestnuts, marigolds, poke berry, and aster are available.
In addition, students enjoy reading Charlie Needs a Cloak by Tomie de Paola, in which the main character uses poke berry to dye the wool from his sheep.