jet stream

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Related to Polar jet stream: Subtropical jet stream

jet stream

n.
1. A high-speed, meandering wind current, generally moving from a westerly direction at speeds often exceeding 400 kilometers (250 miles) per hour at altitudes of 10 to 15 kilometers (6 to 9 miles).
2. A high-speed stream; a jet.

jet stream

or

jetstream

n
1. (Physical Geography) meteorol a narrow belt of high-altitude winds (about 12 000 metres high) moving east at high speeds and having an important effect on frontogenesis
2. (Aeronautics) the jet of exhaust gases produced by a gas turbine, rocket motor, etc

jet′ stream`


n.
1. strong, generally westerly winds concentrated in a relatively narrow and shallow stream in the upper troposphere of the earth.
2. the exhaust of a jet or rocket engine.
[1945–50]

jet stream

A narrow current of strong wind circling the Earth from west to east at altitudes of 10 to 15 miles (16 to 24 kilometers) above sea level. There are usually four distinct jet streams, two each in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

jet stream

A narrow band of high velocity wind in the upper troposphere or in the stratosphere.

jet stream

A narrow corridor of fast-moving air at high altitude.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jet stream - a high-speed high-altitude airstream blowing from west to east near the top of the tropospherejet stream - a high-speed high-altitude airstream blowing from west to east near the top of the troposphere; has important effects of the formation of weather fronts
airstream - a relatively well-defined prevailing wind
Translations
suihkuvirtaus
courant d’altitude
futóáramlás
References in periodicals archive ?
Met Eireann said Ireland's terrible summer is a result of the polar jet stream travelling further south this year.
Riding along this polar jet stream like eddies in a flowing river are the smaller, temporary wind patterns that make up storms.
Moreover, the polar jet stream in the southern hemisphere simply circles the Antarctic continent, and does not operate over land - whereas the northern polar jet stream flows right across North America and Europe.
Normally in summer, the polar jet stream flowing between Scotland and Iceland keeps bad weather north of the UK.
An actual consequence of the ozone hole is its odd effect on the Southern Hemisphere polar jet stream, the fast flowing air currents encircling the South Pole.
The fall climbing season on Everest was over, effectively ended by the arrival of the polar jet stream, which typically lingers at peak elevations until spring and halts climbing.
Exactly why he thinks this requires a basic understanding of natural phenomena called jet streams - long, flowing ribbons of air, one of which, The Polar Jet Stream, was held responsible for last summer's persistent cold and damp conditions.