polarization

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po·lar·i·za·tion

 (pō′lər-ĭ-zā′shən)
n.
1. The production or condition of polarity, as:
a. A process or state in which rays of light exhibit different properties in different directions, especially the state in which all the vibration takes place in one plane.
b. The partial or complete polar separation of the positive and negative electric charges in a nuclear, atomic, molecular, or chemical system.
2. A division into two conflicting or contrasting groups.

polarization

(ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən) or

polarisation

n
1. the condition of having or giving polarity
2. (General Physics) physics the process or phenomenon in which the waves of light or other electromagnetic radiation are restricted to certain directions of vibration, usually specified in terms of the electric field vector

po•lar•i•za•tion

(ˌpoʊ lər əˈzeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a sharp division, as of a population or group, into opposing factions.
2. a state, or the production of a state, in which rays of light or similar radiation exhibit different properties in different directions.
3. the induction of polarity in a ferromagnetic substance; magnetization.
4. the production or acquisition of polarity.

polarization

In transverse waves, vibrations confined to one plane.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polarization - the phenomenon in which waves of light or other radiation are restricted in direction of vibrationpolarization - the phenomenon in which waves of light or other radiation are restricted in direction of vibration
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
2.polarization - the condition of having or giving polarity
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
Translations
polarizace
polarisation d'une antenne

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] N
1. (Elec, Phys) → polarización f
2. (frm) (fig) [of tendencies, opinions, people] → polarización f

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] polarisation (British) nopposition f

polarization

n (Phys) → Polarisation f; (fig)Polarisierung f

polarization

[ˌpəʊləraɪˈzeɪʃn] npolarizzazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetic fields at small scales that are inside star-forming concentrations of gas and dust can be studied by ALMA "by mapping the polarization of light emitted by dust grains that have aligned themselves with the magnetic field.
One of the ways that animals have achieved this is to make use of the polarization of light rather than colour.
These techniques exploit the polarization of light to follow cellular events, from the building of the mitotic spindle to the formation of septin structures, one molecule at a time.
The ability to control circular polarization of light with structures like these could allow scientists to increase the bandwidth of optical communications, the researchers say.
These dots change the polarization of light travelling through the disc which is read using a microscope and polarizer.
com), global experts in optical manufacturing, customized optical solutions, and precision thin film coatings, introduces a new polarizing beamsplitter cube that splits up the S & P polarization of light with an extinction ratio of Tp/Ts 200:1 and higher.
A spectroscopic ellipsometer is a high-precision and non-contacts measurement instrument that uses changes in the polarization of light to measure the thickness and optical coefficients (refractive index and extinction coefficient) of a transparent or semi-transparent thin film.
This effect was used by Jack Kemp (University of Oregon) during the 1982-84 eclipse, and more recently by Kemp's former student Gary Henson (now at East Tennessee State University) and by Nevada amateur Gary Cole (see page 24) to detect strong variations in the polarization of light from Epsilon Aurigae during the eclipse.
The LASP photopolarimeter, a small telescope that measured the intensity and polarization of light at different wavelengths, was used for a variety of observations during the mission.
Polarization of light with applications in optical fibers.
The Royal Society of London in 1856 awarded Mr Pasteur the Rumford Medal for his researches relative to the polarization of light and decorated with the Legion d' Honneur in 1853, he was promoted to be an officer of the Order in 1863, and commander in 1868.

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