Athena

(redirected from Polias)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

A·the·na

 (ə-thē′nə) also A·the·ne (-nē)
n. Greek Mythology
The goddess of wisdom, the practical arts, and warfare, and the protector of cities, especially Athens.

Athena

(əˈθiːnə) or

Athene

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a virgin goddess of wisdom, practical skills, and prudent warfare. She was born, fully armed, from the head of Zeus. Also called: Pallas Athena or Pallas Roman counterpart: Minerva

A•the•na

(əˈθi nə)

n.
a virgin deity of the ancient Greeks, worshiped as the goddess of wisdom, fertility, the useful arts, and prudent warfare; identified by the Romans with Minerva.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Athena - (Greek mythology) goddess of wisdom and useful arts and prudent warfareAthena - (Greek mythology) goddess of wisdom and useful arts and prudent warfare; guardian of Athens; identified with Roman Minerva
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations
Атина
Athéna
Athene
Athene
Atena
Athene
Athéna
Atina
AthénaAthéné
Athena
Athene
Atena
Atena
Atena
Athena
Athena

Athena

[əˈθiːnə] Athene [əˈθiːnɪ‘] nAtena
References in periodicals archive ?
Polias, 2005; Christie & Dreyfus, 2007; Macken Horarick & Morgan, 2011), the research has much to contribute to teacher educators whose fields straddle the above disciplines, such as educational psychologists, philosophers, curriculum specialists and comparative educators.
We begin by introducing the idea of a functional approach to grammar, based on the work of linguists such as Beverley Derewianka, John Polias and Brian Dare who were all influenced by Professor Michael Halliday.
103) that Charmides slips off the statue is an apparent reference to the new saffron-dyed peplos woven for Athena every four years and taken up to the Acropolis in the Greater Panathenaic procession; but this gown was destined for the statue of Athena Polias in the Erechtheion, an ancient and rudimentary wooden idol that would have made a grotesque object of sexual attention--certainly a more genuinely perverse one.