police officer

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police officer

n.
A policeman or policewoman.

police officer

n
(Law) a member of a police force, esp a constable; policeman. Often (esp as form of address) shortened to: officer

police′ of`ficer


n.
a policeman or policewoman.
[1790–1800]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.police officer - a member of a police forcepolice officer - a member of a police force; "it was an accident, officer"
constabulary, police, police force, law - the force of policemen and officers; "the law came looking for him"
bobby - an informal term for a British policeman
cop, fuzz, copper, pig, bull - uncomplimentary terms for a policeman
police captain, police chief, captain - a policeman in charge of a precinct
police constable, constable - a police officer of the lowest rank
detective, police detective, tec, investigator - a police officer who investigates crimes
gendarme - a French policeman
inspector - a high ranking police officer
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law
motorcycle cop, motorcycle policeman, speed cop - a policeman who rides a motorcycle (and who checks the speeds of motorists)
police matron, policewoman - a woman policeman
Mountie - colloquial term for a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
shoofly - an undercover police officer who investigates other policemen
traffic cop - a policeman who controls the flow of automobile traffic
trooper - a mounted policeman
state trooper, trooper - a state police officer

police officer

noun cop (slang), officer, pig (offensive slang), bobby (informal), copper (slang), constable, plod (Brit. slang), peeler (Irish and obsolete Brit. slang), gendarme (slang), fuzz (slang), woodentop (slang), bizzy (informal), flatfoot (slang), rozzer (slang), policeman or policewoman a meeting of senior police officers

police officer

noun
A member of a law-enforcement agency:
Informal: cop, law.
Slang: bull, copper, flatfoot, fuzz, gendarme, heat, man (often uppercase).
Chiefly British: bobby, constable, peeler.
Translations
policista
politibetjent
poliisi
policajac
rendőr
警察官
경찰관
policaj
polis
เจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจ
cảnh sátviên cảnh sát

police officer

n (man) → agente m di polizia; (woman) → donna f poliziotto inv

police officer

شُرْطِيّ policista politibetjent Polizist αστυνομικός agente de policía poliisi gardien de la paix policajac agente di polizia 警察官 경찰관 politiebeambte politibetjent policjant agente da polícia, policial полицейский polis เจ้าหน้าที่ตำรวจ polis görevlisi viên cảnh sát 警官
References in classic literature ?
Police were stationed at the brightly lit entrance which was carpeted with red baize, and not only gendarmes but dozens of police officers and even the police master himself stood at the porch.
Now if the whole room had been filled, not with police officers, but with those nearest and dearest to him, he would not have found one human word for them, so empty was his heart.
Several constables and special police officers, anticipating trouble, trailed along to prevent it, and herded the two gangs separately aboard the train for San Francisco.
Two police officers, looking in their perfectly neat uniform not at all like people who were up all night, were quietly writing at a desk; and the place seemed very quiet altogether, except for some beating and calling out at distant doors underground, to which nobody paid any attention.
We can soon see," replied the police officer, and ringing a bell he summoned an assistant to whom he issued a few directions.
A police officer, regardless of the frost, stood at the entrance, gorgeous in his uniform.
Let her see the police officer in plain clothes enter the room.
When it arrived there, four guards and a police officer, who accompanied it, mounted into the heavy machine and closed the shutters; then through an opening cautiously made, the policeman began to watch the length of the Rue Cocatrix, as if he was waiting for some one.
This is Bermondsey Sal," said one police officer, bending over the bedraggled heap of tattered shawl and dirty skirt.
They were his fellow-citizens gone wrong because of imperfect education, Chief Inspector Heat believed; but allowing for that difference, he could understand the mind of a burglar, because, as a matter of fact, the mind and the instincts of a burglar are of the same kind as the mind and the instincts of a police officer.
In order to arouse her, a police officer was obliged to shake her unmercifully, and the president had to raise his voice,--"Girl, you are of the Bohemian race, addicted to deeds of witchcraft.
But wherefore it was that after having repeatedly smelt the sea as a merchant sailor, I should now take it into my head to go on a whaling voyage; this the invisible police officer of the Fates, who has the constant surveillance of me, and secretly dogs me, and influences me in some unaccountable way --he can better answer than any one else.

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