police procedural

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police procedural

n.
A story or drama about the investigation of a crime by the police.

police procedural

n
(Film) a novel, film, or television drama that deals realistically with police work

police′ proce`dural


n.
a mystery novel, film, or television drama that deals realistically with police work. Also called procedural.
[1965–70]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Peter James writes fascinating police procedurals, and this novel lives up to that reputation if the reader plows through the first half of the book.
THE 80S: THE BEST OF BAD TV Channel 5, 10pm This nostalgic retrospective takes a look back at some of the so-badthey-were good programmes from the 1980s, which was a golden age for sitcoms, sci-fi dramas, police procedurals and action adventures where the good guys always won.
WE Brits do love a detective drama, and the TV listings are saturated with police procedurals.
It may be that the answer is not to try to reinvent the form, as Fox did with "Almost Human,'' but to look to what made police procedurals so popular in the first place.
More police procedurals with lots more famous faces this series.
Central characters are DI Addison, DS Narey and police photographer Tony Winter, with the enigmatic Winter being quite different from many other police procedurals.
When first released in paperback and Ebook formats, it ranked as high as #24 best seller in the Kindle book store among police procedurals.
Having written books that weren't police procedurals I know that central question has to be addressed, and it's a difficult one to make believable.
In rapid succession in other media, successful police procedurals appeared.
The author defines "dark cinema" as "a meta-genre that embraces the macabre and disturbing, shocking and profane, dire and devastating extremes of the contemporary film experience," thus encompassing horror, exploitation film, black comedy, psychological thrillers, and even some types of police procedurals and art house fare.
From "First Offense" to "Last Spin," they are peopled with the confused young adults who learn crime does not pay, damsels in real or feigned distress, and cynical cops with surprising moments of sensitivity and heart who are the hallmarks of McBain's virtuoso police procedurals.
Like ``Hollywoodland,'' ``The Black Dahlia'' spends more time ruminating over Los Angeles as a depository of broken dreams than it does police procedurals.

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