police state

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police state

n.
A state in which the government exercises rigid and repressive controls over the social, economic, and political life of the people, especially by means of a secret police force.

police state

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state or country in which a repressive government maintains control through the police

police′ state`


n.
a totalitarian state or country in which a national police force, esp. a secret police, suppresses any act that conflicts with government policy.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Citizens in police states are forced to believe that they eat, drink, work, live, marry and do their everyday livelihood safely only because of the father, police states call the ruler the father.
As in other police states before it, such as Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany and Stalin's Russia, the free will of a whole community was mastered and corrupted, and ordinary citizens were socialized, through terror, coercion and violence, to accept orthodoxy, uniformity and submission.
He identifies the characteristics of police states and traces American government activities in this dark vein.
I have heard all about police states from my mother-in-law who lived through both Nazi and Soviet police states in Poland between 1945 and 1962.
Maybe six months to a year of reading some authentic black fiction about the urban experience would open his eyes and spirit to what members of the African Diaspora have experienced in police states the length and breadth of the globe.