police state

(redirected from Police-state)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

police state

n.
A state in which the government exercises rigid and repressive controls over the social, economic, and political life of the people, especially by means of a secret police force.

police state

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a state or country in which a repressive government maintains control through the police

police′ state`


n.
a totalitarian state or country in which a national police force, esp. a secret police, suppresses any act that conflicts with government policy.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)police state - a country that maintains repressive control over the people by means of police (especially secret police)
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract award notice: provision of packaging, collection, transport and treatment of hazardous and non-hazardous waste of police-state budget prefecture.
Despite the vast expansion of the police powers of the Executive Branch of government, the extraordinary growth of an entire panoply of repressive agencies with hundreds of thousands of personnel and enormous public and secret budgets, and the vast scope of police-state surveillance, including the acknowledged monitoring of over 40 million US citizens and residents, no mass pro-democracy movement has emerged to confront the powers and prerogatives or even protest the investigations of the police state.
Bush's consolidation of police-state powers under the executive branch, their defense of civil liberties could weaken considerably if a Democrat is elected president two years from now.
Sasha Abramsky's article serves as a perfect example of how we all, even on the left, are being scared into falling in line with the police-state policies of the "war on terror.
The third section, "The Face of a Police State," exposes the extremes of police-state illegalities and brutalities.
The threat of terrorism is being used to centralize police-state powers in the hands of a strong federal executive.
I agree with Evan McElravy: The FTAA protesters in Quebec were misguided, as was the police-state response ("Enemies of Trade," July).
But a better way to fight police-state tactics--one that won't result in clealry guilty criminals being set free--is to punish severely officials who engage in beatings, unwarranted searchings, and the like.
Moreover, the increase in crime and terrorism would provide impetus for police-state measures.
I began to ponder which was more discouraging to me: the presence of so many people so woefully informed about trade or the police-state response to them.
Far from reflecting a police-state mentality, the Los Angeles Superior Court's juror sanction program is about as lenient as it can be and still get the attention of residents who need to understand the importance of serving jury duty.
Second, my suspicions that we five in a police-state verite were more than confirmed with each grainy videotape of the top of someone's bead at the newsstand, or of a stalled, blurred figure running out of view, caught on a parking-lot surveillance camera.