political economy

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political economy

n.
1. The social science that deals with political science and economics as a unified subject; the study of the interrelationships between political and economic processes.
2. The early science of economics through the 1800s.

political economy

n
(Economics) the former name for economics1

polit′ical econ′omy


n.
the science of economics.
[1605–15]

political economy

The social science that studies both politics and economics, and in particular the interrelationship between them.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their managementpolitical economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
production - (economics) manufacturing or mining or growing something (usually in large quantities) for sale; "he introduced more efficient methods of production"
Gresham's Law - (economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
game theory, theory of games - (economics) a theory of competition stated in terms of gains and losses among opposing players
econometrics - the application of mathematics and statistics to the study of economic and financial data
finance - the branch of economics that studies the management of money and other assets
macroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the overall working of a national economy
microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
spillover - (economics) any indirect effect of public expenditure
capital account - (economics) that part of the balance of payments recording a nation's outflow and inflow of financial securities
economic consumption, use of goods and services, usance, consumption, use - (economics) the utilization of economic goods to satisfy needs or in manufacturing; "the consumption of energy has increased steadily"
utility - (economics) a measure that is to be maximized in any situation involving choice
marginal utility - (economics) the amount that utility increases with an increase of one unit of an economic good or service
productivity - (economics) the ratio of the quantity and quality of units produced to the labor per unit of time
monopoly - (economics) a market in which there are many buyers but only one seller; "a monopoly on silver"; "when you have a monopoly you can ask any price you like"
monopsony - (economics) a market in which goods or services are offered by several sellers but there is only one buyer
oligopoly - (economics) a market in which control over the supply of a commodity is in the hands of a small number of producers and each one can influence prices and affect competitors
moral hazard - (economics) the lack of any incentive to guard against a risk when you are protected against it (as by insurance); "insurance companies are exposed to a moral hazard if the insured party is not honest"
real - of, relating to, or representing an amount that is corrected for inflation; "real prices"; "real income"; "real wages"
nominal - of, relating to, or characteristic of an amount that is not adjusted for inflation; "the nominal GDP"; "nominal interest rates"
inflationary - associated with or tending to cause increases in inflation; "inflationary prices"
deflationary - associated with or tending to cause decreases in consumer prices or increases in the purchasing power of money; "deflationary measures"
References in periodicals archive ?
Stanford, Jim (2008a) Radical Economics and Social Change Movements: Strengthening the Links between Academics and Activists, Review of Radical Political Economics, 40(3), pp.
Barry Weingast, Stanford University, "From 'The Lowest State of Poverty and Barbarism' to The Opulent Commercial Society: Adam Smith's Theory of Violence and the Political Economics of Development"
Vallejo, a native of Colombia who holds a master's degree in political economics from Oxford University, has been practicing yoga and meditation since 1978.
The survey, which was conducted by Macro Center for Political Economics in cooperation with the Israeli organization Blue White Future, also found that 46.
His challenge is significant since the related literature (that is, international relations, international political economics, and security studies) has evolved somewhat independently.
Yhprum is Murphy backwards, by the way, but the law is often cited by professors of political economics.
of Bonn, Germany) are Europe-based American studies scholars as are many of the contributors; others are scholars of international relations, political economics, Arabic politics, Islam, and theology, and there's a visual artist and a theologian in the mix.
As the countries on the continent integrate their external relations with the key international players have become a central part of management of their political economics .
Fort graduated with honours from Harvard University with a BA in international political economics, subsequently earning his Masters in Business Administration, with a focus on Finance, from the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business.
That was back in the 1992 presidential election as the electorate appeared ready to change course from the political economics of the Tweedledum-Tweedledee parties which supported the international brand of capitalism, not the domestic variety envisioned by conservative maverick Patrick Buchanan, and the more colorful and controversial, Ross Perot.
He earned a Bachelor's Degree in Political Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.
The question of how collective decisions are made dates back many centuries and has been vigorously studied in social psychology and political economics, but the biological basis of collective decision making in human brain is almost entirely unknown.

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