patronage

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Related to Political patronage: Patron system

pa·tron·age

 (pā′trə-nĭj, păt′rə-)
n.
1. The support or encouragement of a patron, as for an institution or cause.
2. Support or encouragement proffered in a condescending manner: Our little establishment has finally been deemed worthy of the bank's patronage.
3. The trade given to a commercial establishment by its customers: Shopkeepers thanked Christmas shoppers for their patronage.
4. Customers or patrons considered as a group; clientele: The grand old hotel has a loyal but demanding patronage.
5.
a. The power to distribute or appoint people to governmental or political positions.
b. The act of distributing or appointing people to such positions.
c. The positions so distributed or filled.
6. The right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.

patronage

(ˈpætrənɪdʒ)
n
1.
a. the support given or custom brought by a patron or patroness
b. the position of a patron
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in politics)
a. the practice of making appointments to office, granting contracts, etc
b. the favours so distributed
3.
a. a condescending manner
b. any kindness done in a condescending way
4. (Anglicanism) Christianity the right to present a clergyman to a benefice

pa•tron•age

(ˈpeɪ trə nɪdʒ, ˈpæ-)

n.
1. the financial support or business provided to a store, hotel, or the like, by customers, clients, or paying guests.
2. patrons collectively; clientele.
3.
a. the power of public officials to make appointments to government jobs or grant other favors to their supporters.
b. the distribution of such jobs or favors.
c. the jobs or favors so distributed.
4. a condescending manner or attitude in granting favors, in dealing with people, etc.; condescension.
5. the encouragement or support of a patron, as toward an artist or institution.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patronage - the act of providing approval and supportpatronage - the act of providing approval and support; "his vigorous backing of the conservatives got him in trouble with progressives"
approval, approving, blessing - the formal act of approving; "he gave the project his blessing"; "his decision merited the approval of any sensible person"
2.patronage - customers collectively; "they have an upper class clientele"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
3.patronage - a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
4.patronage - (politics) granting favors or giving contracts or making appointments to office in return for political support
social control - control exerted (actively or passively) by group action
nomenklatura - the system of patronage in communist countries; controlled by committees in the Communist Party
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
5.patronage - the business given to a commercial establishment by its customerspatronage - the business given to a commercial establishment by its customers; "even before noon there was a considerable patronage"
business - the volume of commercial activity; "business is good today"; "show me where the business was today"
custom - habitual patronage; "I have given this tailor my custom for many years"
Verb1.patronage - support by being a patron of
maintain, sustain, keep - supply with necessities and support; "She alone sustained her family"; "The money will sustain our good cause"; "There's little to earn and many to keep"
2.patronage - be a regular customer or client of; "We patronize this store"; "Our sponsor kept our art studio going for as long as he could"
nurture, foster - help develop, help grow; "nurture his talents"
keep going, run on - continue uninterrupted; "The disease will run on unchecked"; "The party kept going until 4 A.M."

patronage

noun
1. support, promotion, sponsorship, backing, help, aid, championship, assistance, encouragement, espousal, benefaction Japan is moving into international patronage of the arts.
2. nepotism, bias, favouritism, preferential treatment, partiality a system based on corruption and political patronage
3. condescension, contempt, disdain, snobbery, patronizing, deigning, snobbishness exuding all the patronage that was to be expected from a descendant of doges

patronage

noun
1. Aid or support given by a patron:
aegis, auspice (often used in plural), backing, patronization, sponsorship.
2. The commercial transactions of customers with a supplier:
3. Customers or patrons collectively:
4. The political appointments or jobs that are at the disposal of those in power:
spoil (used in plural).
Slang: pork.
Translations
رِعايَه، مُناصَرَه
mecenášstvípatronát
protektion
asiakaskuntaasiakkaat
pártfogáspatronázsvevőkör
stuîningur velunnara
patronát

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] N (= support) → patrocinio m; (= clients) → clientela f; [of the arts] → mecenazgo m; (political) → apoyo m (Rel) → patronato m
under the patronage ofpatrocinado por, bajo los auspicios de

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] n (= support) → patronage m, appui m

patronage

n
(= support)Schirmherrschaft f; under the patronage of …unter der Schirmherrschaft von …; his lifelong patronage of the artsseine lebenslange Förderung der Künste
(form, of a shop etc) we enjoy the patronage of …zu unseren Kunden zählen; we thank you for your patronagewir danken Ihnen für Ihr Vertrauen; the attitude of the new sales assistant caused her to withdraw her patronagedas Benehmen des neuen Verkäufers veranlasste sie, dort nicht mehr einzukaufen
(= right to appoint to government jobs)Patronat nt; under (the) patronage ofunter der Schirmherrschaft von
(rare: = condescension) an air of patronageeine gönnerhafte Miene

patronage

[ˈpætrənɪdʒ] n (gen) → patrocinio; (of shop) → frequentazione f
under the patronage of → sotto l'alto patrocinio or patronato di
patronage of the arts → mecenatismo

patron

(ˈpeitrən) noun
1. a person who supports (often with money) an artist, musician, writer, form of art etc. He's a patron of the arts.
2. a (regular) customer of a shop etc. The manager said that he knew all his patrons.
patronage (ˈpӕtrənidʒ) , ((American) ˈpei-) noun
the support given by a patron.
ˈpatronize, ˈpatronise (ˈpӕ-) , ((American) ˈpei-) verb
1. to behave towards (someone) in a way which is kind and friendly but which nevertheless shows that one thinks oneself to be more important, clever etc than that person. He's a nice fellow but he does patronize his assistants.
2. to visit (a shop, theatre, society etc) regularly. That's not a shop I patronize nowadays.
ˈpatronizing, ˈpatronising adjective
ˈpatronizingly, ˈpatronisingly adverb
patron saint
a saint who protects a particular person, group of people, country etc. St Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HoL is an anachronism in need of reform and many options have been proposed for changing membership selection from political patronage to various models of election/nomination.
It will do away with a large slice of political patronage.
While the cities are particularly tense during religious festivities such as Ramzan and Kanwaria, thanks to the high density population comprising both Hindus and Muslims, it is the political patronage enjoyed by people indulging in communal activities that is actually damaging the region's tenuous cultural relationship.
It is pertinent to mention that the reference was filed against respondents and others in 2000 wherein it was alleged that Anwar Saifullah Khan as Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources during Benazir Bhuttos second term allocated gas from Dhodak Gas Field on personal selection, on the basis of political patronage and extraneous circumstances, to Safdar Ali Abbasi of Mehran Gas Company ignoring the public Sector Companies.
Oil prices have fallen 50 per cent in a state where "oil money" lubricates political patronage.
ISIL flourishes," he said, when Iraq is weak, and Iraq is weak when it is divided by sectarian politics, when political patronage overtakes national loyalty, he added.
Understanding all that, we were still disappointed to see the educational requirements for top officials in the State Treasurer's Office immediately reduced to the point that they could easily become the kind of political patronage jobs for which just about any well-connected politico is "qualified.
It will be a shame if his job becomes a political patronage position.
Though such incidents have been brought to light time and again, the culprits go unpunished only because of political patronage.
For far too long we have tolerated a culture of political patronage in hiring judicial staff,'' he said.
Political patronage should also extend to enforcement.
Noting that Sathasivam was the first former chief justice set to be appointed as governor, Congress wanted to know from the government whether it was moving to a system where "we expect judiciary to be committed to government for political patronage post retirement".