rhetoric

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rhet·o·ric

 (rĕt′ər-ĭk)
n.
1.
a. The art or study of using language effectively and persuasively.
b. A treatise or book discussing this art.
2. Skill in using language effectively and persuasively.
3.
a. A style of speaking or writing, especially the language of a particular subject: fiery political rhetoric.
b. Language that is elaborate, pretentious, insincere, or intellectually vacuous: His offers of compromise were mere rhetoric.
4. Verbal communication; discourse.

[Middle English rethorik, from Old French rethorique, from Latin rhētoricē, rhētorica, from Greek rhētorikē (tekhnē), rhetorical (art), feminine of rhētorikos, rhetorical, from rhētōr, rhetor; see rhetor.]

rhetoric

(ˈrɛtərɪk)
n
1. (Rhetoric) the study of the technique of using language effectively
2. (Rhetoric) the art of using speech to persuade, influence, or please; oratory
3. excessive use of ornamentation and contrivance in spoken or written discourse; bombast
4. speech or discourse that pretends to significance but lacks true meaning: all the politician says is mere rhetoric.
[C14: via Latin from Greek rhētorikē (tekhnē) (the art of) rhetoric, from rhētōr rhetor]

rhet•o•ric

(ˈrɛt ər ɪk)

n.
1.
a. the art of effectively using language, including the use of figures of speech.
b. language skillfully used.
c. a book or treatise on rhetoric.
2. the undue use of exaggerated language; bombast.
3. the art of prose writing.
4. the art of persuasive speaking; oratory.
[1300–50; Middle English rethorik < Medieval Latin rēthorica, Latin rhētorica < Greek rhētorikḕ (téchnē) rhetorical (art); see rhetor, -ic]

rhetoric

  • rhetor - A teacher of rhetoric or a master of it.
  • climax - First described propositions in rhetoric, one rising above the other in effectiveness; it comes from Greek klimax, "ladder."
  • demagoguery, demagogy - Demagoguery and demagogy are the practices or rhetoric of a demagogue.
  • scheme - From Greek skhema, "figure, form," it first referred to a figure of speech, especially a figure of rhetoric, denoting a way of deviating from the ordinary use and order of words to create special effect.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rhetoric - using language effectively to please or persuade
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
2.rhetoric - high-flown stylerhetoric - high-flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation; "the grandiosity of his prose"; "an excessive ornateness of language"
flourish - a display of ornamental speech or language
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
blah, bombast, claptrap, fustian, rant - pompous or pretentious talk or writing
3.rhetoric - loud and confused and empty talk; "mere rhetoric"
hokum, meaninglessness, nonsense, nonsensicality, bunk - a message that seems to convey no meaning
4.rhetoric - study of the technique and rules for using language effectively (especially in public speaking)
literary study - the humanistic study of literature
exordium - (rhetoric) the introductory section of an oration or discourse
narration - (rhetoric) the second section of an oration in which the facts are set forth
peroration - (rhetoric) the concluding section of an oration; "he summarized his main points in his peroration"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
epanodos - repetition of a group of words in reverse order
epanodos - recapitulation of the main ideas of a speech (especially in reverse order)
ploce - (rhetoric) repetition to gain special emphasis or extend meaning
allocution - (rhetoric) a formal or authoritative address that advises or exhorts
anacoluthic - of or related to syntactic inconsistencies of the sort known as anacoluthons

rhetoric

noun
1. hyperbole, rant, hot air (informal), pomposity, bombast, wordiness, verbosity, fustian, grandiloquence, magniloquence He has continued his warlike rhetoric.
2. oratory, eloquence, public speaking, speech-making, elocution, declamation, speechifying, grandiloquence, spieling (informal) the noble institutions, such as political rhetoric

rhetoric

noun
The art of public speaking:
Translations
řečnictvírétorika
puhetaitoretoriikka
govorništvoretorika

rhetoric

[ˈretərɪk] Nretórica f

rhetoric

[ˈrɛtərɪk] nrhétorique f

rhetoric

nRhetorik f; (pej)Phrasendrescherei f (pej)

rhetoric

[ˈrɛtərɪk] nretorica
References in periodicals archive ?
And it is now clear that, despite all the barriers in the way, both Kurdish and Turkish people have stood up to embrace the kind of peaceful political rhetoric seen in the Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) party.
With all the political rhetoric and apologies for the drowning of Capel Celyn (which opened a year to the day before the Aberfan disater), in a year's time can we expect the British Governement to wholly repay this debt (about PS1,850,000 less the PS150,000 repaid in 1997).
His Beatitude called not to doubt the Army, urging politicians to raise their political rhetoric to the level of political responsibility in order to shun Lebanon the repercussions of disagreement.
But for the most part, the public has only been treated to stormy demonstrations in the street and a diet of stormy political rhetoric, which might explain how tensions continue to be defused daily in this part of a turbulent region.
The broad message which has gone to the various actors in Pakistan, including permanent establishment and the non-State actors is that whatever the BJP had been saying over the past 10 years was merely political rhetoric.
Smith comprises a series of papers that apply linguistic content analysis (LCA) to analyze the content of political texts and determine if shifts in political rhetoric can help predict the occurrence of terrorist violence.
GIVEN that Vince Cable said rising immigration was "good news" can we now assume that the Libdems have joined the Labour bandwagon who also voice this same political rhetoric in the hope that there are some people listening who might just be tempted to believe them.
Shadow Immigration Minister David Hanson said: "This makes clear that the Home Secretary's claims on immigration have been fuelled by political rhetoric rather than evidence.
This method deploys user-established dictionaries to code text on any number of dimensions and has been used in research on political rhetoric for many years.
It s just more of the same mischievous political rhetoric we hear from the Liberals every day.
It usually uses every option available to get imams in line, but some just don't understand the concept that extremism and political rhetoric is counterproductive.
Cameron''s political rhetoric of we''re all in this togethercould actually be true.

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