antiphon

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an·ti·phon

 (ăn′tə-fŏn′)
n.
1. A devotional composition sung responsively as part of a liturgy.
2.
a. A short liturgical text chanted or sung responsively preceding or following a psalm, psalm verse, or canticle.
b. Such a text formerly used as a response but now rendered independently.
3. A response; a reply: "It would be truer ... to see [conservation] as an antiphon to the modernization of the 1950s and 1960s" (Raphael Samuel).

[Late Latin antiphōna, sung responses; see anthem.]

antiphon

(ˈæntɪfən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a short passage, usually from the Bible, recited or sung as a response after certain parts of a liturgical service
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a psalm, hymn, etc, chanted or sung in alternate parts
3. any response or answer
[C15: from Late Latin antiphōna sung responses, from Late Greek, plural of antiphōnon (something) responsive, from antiphōnos, from anti- + phōnē sound]

an•ti•phon

(ˈæn təˌfɒn)

n.
1. a verse, prayer, or song to be chanted or sung in response.
2. a text recited or sung before or after some part of the liturgical service.
[1490–1500; < Medieval Latin antiphōna responsive singing < Greek, neuter pl. of antíphōnos sounding in answer]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.antiphon - a verse or song to be chanted or sung in responseantiphon - a verse or song to be chanted or sung in response
church music, religious music - genre of music composed for performance as part of religious ceremonies
gradual - (Roman Catholic Church) an antiphon (usually from the Book of Psalms) immediately after the epistle at Mass
Translations

antiphon

[ˈæntɪfən] Nantífona f

antiphon

[ˈæntɪfən] n (Rel) → antifona
References in periodicals archive ?
Renaissance music lovers will enjoy four polyphonic works and a dance: two Canzone in majestic Venetian polychoral style by the Italian composer Giovanni Gabrielli, a Ricercare by Andrea Gabrielli, an arrangement by Alkis Baltas of the highly expressive French chanson Mille Regretz by the Franco-flemish composer Josquin des Prez, as well as the jubilant dance La Mourisque by the Flemish composer Tielman Susato.
Only in the late 1980s and early 1990s did conductor Sergio Vartolo record several compact discs of large-scale polychoral vesper psalms by Colonna with soloists, choirs, and instrumentalists gathered under the name of the Cappella Musicale di San Petronio for the Bolognese label Tactus.
Tallis/ Striggio As a chorister, meeting the challenge of polychoral renaissance music really fires me up.
In Chapter 1, Varwig places Schutz's polychoral motets within the context of the 1617 celebrations of the centenary of Luther's posting of his Ninety-Five Theses.
However, Fenlon asks whether the reconfiguration might also have been prompted by the polychoral psalm settings of Adrian Willaert, who had recently been appointed choir-master.
In the third section Kendrick moves to a discussion of the music, styles, and genres, providing a detailed description of how Milanese composers worked with the polychoral or cori spezzati style, most often connected with Venice and Rome, and also how certain composers cultivated the new sacred concerto style, in which voices were accompanied by instruments and basso continuo.
ABREU, Jose, Sacred polychoral repertory in Portugal, ca.
Two Canzone in majestic Venetian polychoral style by the Italian composer Giovanni Gabrielli, a Ricercare by Andrea Gabrielli, an arrangement by Alkis Baltas of the highly expressive French chanson 'Mille Regretz' by the Franco-flemish composer Josquin des Prez, and the jubilant dance 'La Mourisque' by
If Maderna in his later compositions and transcriptions referred to the Venetian polychoral tradition in the spatial distribution of voices and instruments, this trait is apparent only indirectly in his Requiem.
Now the Warwick-based Armonico Consort is touring the piece around the region, programming it alongside other polychoral works including the CD chart-topping 40-part Spem in Alium by our own Thomas Tallis.
is in this collection; the piece is based on the 8-part polychoral motet Iniquos odio habui.