polyene

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Related to Polyenes: Azoles

pol·y·ene

 (pŏl′ē-ēn′)
n.
An organic compound containing two or more carbon-carbon double bonds.

polyene

(ˈpɒlɪˌiːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a chemical compound containing a chain of alternating single and double carbon-carbon bonds
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the antifungal drugs available to successfully treat these infections are becoming increasingly limited, with polyenes, allylamines, azoles (e.
In a paper published in 2014 in the journal Nature Chemistry, Burke showed that most of the motifs of a class of compounds called polyenes could be made from just 12 basic building blocks by repeating a simple chemical reaction.
Treatment of fungal infections currently available in the market can be broadly classified into four major classes of antifungal drugs - Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins.
The first degradation step, which is at the temperature up to about 369T, presents the process of dehydrochlorination and the formation of polyenes caused by PVC and CPE (33).
Drug Interactions with the following drugs or classes of drugs may occur: Antiarrhythmics, Anticonvulsants, Anti-HIV Agents, Antimycobacterials, Antineoplastics, Antipsychotics, Benzodiazepines, Calcium Channel Blockers, Gastric Acid Suppressors/Neutralizers, Gastrointestinal Motility Agents, HMG CoA-Reductase Inhibitors, Macrolide Antibiotics, Oral Hypoglycemic Agents, Polyenes, Opiate Analgesics.
polyenes (eg amphotericin-B) and azoles (eg econazole and fluconazole) (Table 2).
GII) is pleased to announce a new market research report, “Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth” by GBI Research.
Plant chlorophylls and carotenoids are highly colored, conjugated polyenes that play central roles in photosynthesis.
mechanisms for the growth of conjugated polyenes during the
2,12) Currently, there are 4 classes of antifungal agents with activity against Aspergillus: 1) the polyenes such as amphotericin B, 2) the triazoles, including itraconazole and voriconazole, 3) the echinocandins, such as caspofungin and micofungin, and 4) the allylamines, such as terbinafine.
The authors use the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation and show the parametric method for calculations for polyenes and acenes.
While one of the least common mechanisms of antibiotic action, cell membrane disruption is accomplished by the use of the polyenes (amphotericin B for fungal diseases and polymyxin B for topical use against primarily Gram-negative bacteria).