poplar

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poplar

a tree
Not to be confused with:
popular – favorably regarded, well-liked; representing the people, common: popular belief
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poplar
balsam poplar
Populus balsamifera

pop·lar

 (pŏp′lər)
n.
1.
a. Any of several fast-growing deciduous trees of the genus Populus, having unisexual flowers borne in catkins and seeds with cottony tufts.
b. The wood of any of these trees.

[Middle English popler, from Old French poplier, from pouple, from Latin pōpulus.]

poplar

(ˈpɒplə)
n
1. (Plants) any tree of the salicaceous genus Populus, of N temperate regions, having triangular leaves, flowers borne in catkins, and light soft wood. See also aspen, balsam poplar, Lombardy poplar, white poplar
2. (Plants) any of various trees resembling the true poplars, such as the tulip tree
3. (Forestry) the wood of any of these trees
[C14: from Old French poplier, from pouple, from Latin pōpulus]

pop•lar

(ˈpɒp lər)

n.
1. any of several rapidly growing softwood trees of the genus Populus, of the willow family, usu. with a columnar or spirelike shape.
2. any of various similar trees, as the tulip tree.
3. the wood of any of these trees.
[1350–1400; Middle English popler(e), populer < Anglo-French; Old French pop(u)lier =pouple (< Latin pōpulus poplar) + -ier -er2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poplar - soft light-colored non-durable wood of the poplarpoplar - soft light-colored non-durable wood of the poplar
poplar tree, poplar - any of numerous trees of north temperate regions having light soft wood and flowers borne in catkins
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.poplar - any of numerous trees of north temperate regions having light soft wood and flowers borne in catkinspoplar - any of numerous trees of north temperate regions having light soft wood and flowers borne in catkins
genus Populus, Populus - a genus of trees of the family Salicaceae that is found in the northern hemisphere; poplars
poplar - soft light-colored non-durable wood of the poplar
balsam poplar, hackmatack, Populus balsamifera, tacamahac - poplar of northeastern North America with broad heart-shaped leaves
abele, aspen poplar, Populus alba, silver-leaved poplar, white aspen, white poplar - a poplar that is widely cultivated in the United States; has white bark and leaves with whitish undersurfaces
gray poplar, grey poplar, Populus canescens - large rapidly growing poplar with faintly lobed dentate leaves grey on the lower surface; native to Europe but introduced and naturalized elsewhere
black poplar, Populus nigra - large European poplar
cottonwood - any of several North American trees of the genus Populus having a tuft of cottony hairs on the seed
aspen - any of several trees of the genus Populus having leaves on flattened stalks so that they flutter in the lightest wind
angiospermous tree, flowering tree - any tree having seeds and ovules contained in the ovary
Translations
топола
topol
poppel
pappel
سپیدارسفیدارقواخ
poppeli
jablantopola
nyár
ポプラ
포플러
populus
plop
jablantopolaјаблантопола
poppel
ต้นพ็อปล่าร์
cây bạch dương

poplar

[ˈpɒpləʳ] N (black) → chopo m, álamo m; (white) → álamo m blanco

poplar

[ˈpɒplər] npeuplier m

poplar

nPappel f

poplar

[ˈpɒpləʳ] npioppo
black poplar → pioppo nero europeo

poplar

حُور topol poppel Pappel λεύκα álamo poppeli peuplier jablan pioppo ポプラ 포플러 populier poppel topola choupo тополь poppel ต้นพ็อปล่าร์ kavak cây bạch dương 白杨
References in classic literature ?
Why does the Lombardy poplar hold its branches straight up in the air like that, when all the other poplars hold theirs out or hang them down?
The rows of tall Lombardy poplars down its lane stood out in stately, purple silhouette against the sky.
A cool wind was blowing down over the long harvest fields from the rims of firry western hills and whistling through the poplars.
Those poplars are ten years old; have you ever seen any that are better grown than these of mine?
The afternoon was already deepening into evening, and the titanic shadows of the poplars lengthened over a third of the landscape.
But there, down in the dingle, is the church of Cardillac, and you may see the inn where three poplars grow beyond the village.
In addition to this show of cultivation were two rows of young Lombardy poplars, a tree but lately introduced into America, formally lining either side of a pathway which led from a gate that opened on the principal street to the front door of the building.
It had no park, but the pleasure-grounds were tolerably extensive; and like every other place of the same degree of importance, it had its open shrubbery, and closer wood walk, a road of smooth gravel winding round a plantation, led to the front, the lawn was dotted over with timber, the house itself was under the guardianship of the fir, the mountain-ash, and the acacia, and a thick screen of them altogether, interspersed with tall Lombardy poplars, shut out the offices.
While other towns boast of the magnificence of their arsenals and dock-yards, and the splendour of their shops and markets, Haarlem's claims to fame rest upon her superiority to all other provincial cities in the number and beauty of her spreading elms, graceful poplars, and, more than all, upon her pleasant walks, shaded by the lovely arches of magnificent oaks, lindens, and chestnuts.
I say, we fought under the poplars, both Abbots and all the monks, and one laid open my forehead to the bone.
In ten minutes D'Artagnan reached the end of an alley regularly planted with fine poplars and terminating in an iron gate, the points and crossed bars of which were gilt.
He was all eyes as the train sped through the country; he adored the sand dunes, their colour seemed to him more lovely than anything he had ever seen; and he was enchanted with the canals and the long lines of poplars.