election

(redirected from Popular vote)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

e·lec·tion

 (ĭ-lĕk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of electing someone to fill an office or position: Officers are chosen by election and not by appointment.
b. An instance of this: Did you vote in this election?
c. The fact of being elected: her election to the Senate.
2. An act of choosing; a selection: your election of benefits.
3. Predestined salvation, especially as conceived by Calvinists.

election

(ɪˈlɛkʃən)
n
1. (Parliamentary Procedure) the selection by vote of a person or persons from among candidates for a position, esp a political office
2. a public vote on an official proposition
3. the act or an instance of choosing
4. (Protestantism) Christianity
a. the doctrine of Calvin that God chooses certain individuals for salvation without reference to their faith or works
b. the doctrine of Arminius and others that God chooses for salvation those who, by grace, persevere in faith and works

e•lec•tion

(ɪˈlɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the selection by vote of a candidate for office.
2. a public vote upon candidates, etc., submitted.
3. the choice by God of individuals, as for salvation.
[1225–75; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]

election

the theological doctrine of God’s predestination of individuals as objects of divine mercy and salvation.
See also: Christianity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.election - a vote to select the winner of a position or political officeelection - a vote to select the winner of a position or political office; "the results of the election will be announced tonight"
reelection - election again; "he did not run for reelection"
vote - the opinion of a group as determined by voting; "they put the question to a vote"
general election - a national or state election; candidates are chosen in all constituencies
primary, primary election - a preliminary election where delegates or nominees are chosen
bye-election, by-election - a special election between regular elections
runoff - a final election to resolve an earlier election that did not produce a winner
poll - the counting of votes (as in an election)
absentee ballot - (election) a ballot that is cast while absent (usually mailed in prior to election day)
contestee - a winner (of a race or an election etc.) whose victory is contested
contester - someone who contests an outcome (of a race or an election etc.)
public servant - someone who holds a government position (either by election or appointment)
absolute majority, majority - (elections) more than half of the votes
relative majority, plurality - (in an election with more than 2 options) the number of votes for the candidate or party receiving the greatest number (but less that half of the votes)
2.election - the act of selecting someone or something; the exercise of deliberate choice; "her election of medicine as a profession"
selection, choice, option, pick - the act of choosing or selecting; "your choice of colors was unfortunate"; "you can take your pick"
co-optation, co-option - the selection of a new member (usually by a vote of the existing membership)
cumulative vote - an election in which each person has as many votes as there are positions to be filled and they can all be cast for one candidate or can be distributed in any manner
3.election - the status or fact of being elected; "they celebrated his election"
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
4.election - the predestination of some individuals as objects of divine mercy (especially as conceived by Calvinists)
foreordination, predetermination, preordination, predestination - (theology) being determined in advance; especially the doctrine (usually associated with Calvin) that God has foreordained every event throughout eternity (including the final salvation of mankind)

election

noun
1. vote, poll, ballot, determination, referendum, franchise, plebiscite, show of hands Poland's first fully free elections for more than fifty years
2. appointment, choosing, picking, choice, selection the election of the Labour government in 1964
Quotations
"Elections are won by men and women chiefly because most people vote against somebody rather than for somebody" [Franklin P. Adams Nods and Becks]

election

noun
The act of choosing:
Translations
أنْتِخابانتخاباِنْتِخَاب
volby
valg
elekto
vaalit
izbori
választás
kosningar
選挙
선거
volitve
val
การเลือกตั้ง
sự bầu cử

election

[ɪˈlɛkʃən]
n
(= event) → élection f
to hold an election → procéder à une élection
[person, government] → élection f
election as sth → élection comme qch, élection au poste de qch
modif [broadcast, date, day, year, winner] → des élections; [manifesto, promise, pledge, platform, defeat, result] → électoral(e); [candidate] → aux électionselection campaign ncampagne f électorale

election

nWahl f; his election to the chairmanshipseine Wahl zum Vorsitzenden; election debacleWahldebakel nt

election

in cpdsWahl-; election victory/defeatWahlsieg m/-niederlage f;
election campaign
nWahlkampf m

election

[ɪˈlɛkʃn] nelezione f; (of Government) → elezioni fpl
to hold an election → indire un'elezione
the election will be held next week → l'elezione avrà luogo la settimana prossima

elect

(iˈlekt) verb
1. to choose by vote. He was elected chairman; elected to the committee.
2. to choose (to do something). They elected to go by taxi.
adjective
(placed immediately after noun) chosen for office but not yet in it. the president elect.
eˈlection (-ʃən) noun
the choosing, or choice, (usually by vote) of person(s) for office. When do the elections take place?; He is standing for election again.
eˌlectioˈneer (-ʃə-) verb
to work to bring about the election of a candidate.
eˈlector noun
a person who has the right to vote at an election. Not all the electors bothered to vote.
eˈlectoral adjective
of elections or electors. The names of all electors are listed in the electoral roll.
eˈlectorate (-rət) noun
all electors taken together. Half of the electorate did not vote.

election

اِنْتِخَاب volby valg Wahl εκλογές elección vaalit élection izbori elezione 選挙 선거 verkiezing valg wybory eleição выборы val การเลือกตั้ง seçim sự bầu cử 选举
References in classic literature ?
for so the popular vote Inclines, here to continue, and build up here A growing Empire; doubtless; while we dream, And know not that the King of Heav'n hath doom'd This place our dungeon, not our safe retreat Beyond his Potent arm, to live exempt From Heav'ns high jurisdiction, in new League Banded against his Throne, but to remaine In strictest bondage, though thus far remov'd, Under th' inevitable curb, reserv'd His captive multitude: For he, be sure, In highth or depth, still first and last will Reign Sole King, and of his Kingdom loose no part By our revolt, but over Hell extend His Empire, and with Iron Scepter rule Us here, as with his Golden those in Heav'n.
10, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- New Hope Natural Media and Sterling-Rice Group today revealed the NEXTY Editors' Choice and Popular Vote award winners.
HB 3077, the National Popular Vote bill, would commit Oregon to pledge its seven Electoral College votes to the candidate who wins the most votes nationwide.
Congress confirmed on Friday that Barack Obama was the overall winner of the 2012 presidential election, with 332 electoral votes as well as the popular vote.
Under the US system, the winner is not determined by the nationwide popular vote but in state-by-state contests, making nine states that do not consistently vote Republican nor Democratic extremely important in such a tight race.
Most polls are showing little between the candidates in terms of overall share of the popular vote but Obama has a clear edge in many of the sw ing states including Ohio, where he is a 2-9 shot to win.
National opinion polls showed a race for the popular vote in tomorrow's election so close that only a statistically insignificant point or two separated the two rivals.
In a worst-case scenario, the storm disruption could cause Obama to lose the popular vote and still win re-election, stirring up vitriolic memories of the contested 2000 battle that allowed Republican George W.
8 percent of the popular vote and 332 electoral votes.
The system was also supposed to ensure that a candidate with overwhelming support in only one part of the country--which might enable him to win a slim majority of the popular vote nationally--would not be elected against the will of the rest of the nation.
Aside from its power to override the popular vote, the Electoral College has another significant potential role to play in disputed elections.
in supporting a different idea known as the "Agreement Among the States to Elect the President by National Popular Vote," or the NPV compact.