porch

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Related to Porches: Isidore

porch

 (pôrch)
n.
1. A covered platform, usually having a separate roof, at an entrance to a building.
2. An open or enclosed gallery or room attached to the outside of a building; a veranda.
3. Obsolete A portico or covered walk.

[Middle English porche, from Old French, from Latin porticus, portico, from porta, gate; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

porch

(pɔːtʃ)
n
1. (Architecture) a low structure projecting from the doorway of a house and forming a covered entrance
2. (Architecture) US and Canadian an exterior roofed gallery, often partly enclosed; veranda
[C13: from French porche, from Latin porticus portico]

porch

(pɔrtʃ, poʊrtʃ)

n.
1. an exterior appendage to a building, forming a covered approach or vestibule to a doorway.
2. a veranda.
3. Obs. a portico.
[1250–1300; Middle English porche < Old French < Latin porticus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entranceporch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
back porch - a porch for the back door
deck - a porch that resembles the deck on a ship
front porch - a porch for the front door
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
portico - a porch or entrance to a building consisting of a covered and often columned area
stoep, stoop - small porch or set of steps at the front entrance of a house
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
veranda, verandah, gallery - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)

porch

noun vestibule, hall, entry, lobby, entrance, foyer, portal, entrance hall, portico She stood framed in the doorway of the porch.
Translations
رُوَاقشُرْفَه، برندامَدْخَل خارِجي مَسْقوف
krytý vchodveranda
vindfangveranda
kuisti
trijem
veröndyfirbyggîur inngangur
ポーチ
현관
priebutispriemenėveranda
lievenisveranda
krytý vchod
verandavetrolov
veranda
ชานบ้าน
verandasundurma
cổng vòm

porch

[pɔːtʃ] N [of church] → pórtico m; [of house] → porche m, portal m (US) (= veranda) → porche m, terraza f

porch

[ˈpɔːrtʃ] n
(= entrance) [house, church] → porche m
(US) (= veranda) → véranda f

porch

n (of house)Vorbau m, → Vordach nt; (US) → Veranda f; (of church)Vorhalle f, → Portal nt

porch

[pɔːtʃ] nveranda; (of church) → sagrato

porch

(poːtʃ) noun
1. a covered entrance to a building. They waited in the porch until it stopped raining.
2. a veranda.

porch

رُوَاق krytý vchod vindfang Vorbau βεράντα πρόσοψης porche kuisti entrée trijem veranda ポーチ 현관 veranda vindfang ganek varanda крыльцо veranda ชานบ้าน veranda cổng vòm 门廊
References in classic literature ?
At last there was something to do in those long, empty summer evenings, when the married people sat like images on their front porches, and the boys and girls tramped and tramped the board sidewalks-- northward to the edge of the open prairie, south to the depot, then back again to the post-office, the ice-cream parlour, the butcher shop.
But if his eyes were broad as the lens of Herschel's great telescope; and his ears capacious as the porches of cathedrals; would that make him any longer of sight, or sharper of hearing?
After dinner the guests of both sexes distributed themselves about the front porches and the ornamental grounds belonging to the hotel, to enjoy the cool air; but, as the twilight deepened toward darkness, they gathered themselves together in that saddest and solemnest and most constrained of all places, the great blank drawing-room which is the chief feature of all continental summer hotels.
Mean while the winged Haralds by command Of Sovran power, with awful Ceremony And Trumpets sound throughout the Host proclaim A solemn Councel forthwith to be held At PANDAEMONIUM, the high Capital Of Satan and his Peers: thir summons call'd From every and Band squared Regiment By place or choice the worthiest; they anon With hundreds and with thousands trooping came Attended: all access was throng'd, the Gates And Porches wide, but chief the spacious Hall (Though like a cover'd field, where Champions bold Wont ride in arm'd, and at the Soldans chair Defi'd the best of Panim chivalry To mortal combat or carreer with Lance) Thick swarm'd, both on the ground and in the air, Brusht with the hiss of russling wings.
They saw few or no churches, but the prophet's mansion, the court-house, and the arsenal, blue-brick houses with verandas and porches, surrounded by gardens bordered with acacias, palms, and locusts.
He observed that the average homes were merely a little larger than his own--four, six, or eight rooms instead of one, made a little trimmer with neat porches and surrounded by well-cut lawns, instead of weeds.
These titles were not only picked out in shaded Gothic on the garden gates, but appeared a second time on the porches, where they followed the semicircular curve of the entrance arch in block capitals.
Then the way went by long lines of dark windows diversified by turreted towers and porches of eccentric shapes, where old stone lions and grotesque monsters bristled outside dens of shadow and snarled at the evening gloom over the escutcheons they held in their grip.
A few miserable, greenish hovels, hanging over the water in front of these sumptuous Hôtels, did not prevent one from seeing the fine angles of their façades, their large, square windows with stone mullions, their pointed porches overloaded with statues, the vivid outlines of their walls, always clear cut, and all those charming accidents of architecture, which cause Gothic art to have the air of beginning its combinations afresh with every monument.
Over some of the porches paper vines were twined, giving them a cozy and shady look.
As our friends marched along, some of the foxes came out on the porches and balconies to get a view of the strangers.
He brought our Saviour to the western side Of that high mountain, whence he might behold Another plain, long, but in breadth not wide, Washed by the southern sea, and on the north To equal length backed with a ridge of hills That screened the fruits of the earth and seats of men From cold Septentrion blasts; thence in the midst Divided by a river, off whose banks On each side an Imperial City stood, With towers and temples proudly elevate On seven small hills, with palaces adorned, Porches and theatres, baths, aqueducts, Statues and trophies, and triumphal arcs, Gardens and groves, presented to his eyes Above the highth of mountains interposed-- By what strange parallax, or optic skill Of vision, multiplied through air, or glass Of telescope, were curious to enquire.