groundwater

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Related to Pore water: Pore water pressure

ground·wa·ter

also ground water  (ground′wô′tər, -wŏt′ər)
n.
Water beneath the earth's surface, often between saturated soil and rock, that supplies wells and springs.

groundwater

(ˈɡraʊndˌwɔːtə)
n
(Physical Geography) underground water that has come mainly from the seepage of surface water and is held in pervious rocks

ground′wa`ter

or ground′ wa`ter,


n.
the water beneath the surface of the ground, the source of spring and well water.
[1885–90]

ground·wa·ter

(ground′wô′tər)
Water that flows or collects beneath the Earth's surface. Groundwater originates from rain and from melting snow and ice. It sinks into the ground, filling the small empty spaces in soil, sediment, and porous rocks. Aquifers, springs, and wells are supplied by the flow of groundwater.
Translations

groundwater

[ˈgraʊndwɔːtəʳ] Nagua f subterránea, aguas fpl superficiales

groundwater

[ˈgraʊndwɔːtər] nnappe f phréatique
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought that the pore water chemistry is controlled by chemical equilibrium with respect to most of the reactive minerals contributing to the water-rock interaction processes in the clay formation, with the exception of certain free or non-reacting constituents.
The reason is probably that the change of pore water pressure had little effect on sample made up of large grain diameter.
Although debris acquired from pore water may constitute a small amount of the total gut content, it may have a significant nutritional role.
But that strength disappears with an increase in pore water pressure during shaking.
Profiles of natural tracers dissolved in pore water of argillaceous rock formations can be considered as large-scale and long-term natural experiments which enable the transport properties to be characterised.
Tenders are invited for Guidance on Seismic Site Response Analysis with Pore Water Pressure Generation
However, the pore water suction that causes plants to wilt, [h.
91, Land 1985) and assuming equatorial surface temperatures (of 20-30 [degrees]C), we get that the dolomites would have been precipitated in equilibrium with pore water with [delta][sup.
These flows usually begin when the pore pressures in a fine-grained mass increase until enough of the weight of the material is supported by pore water to significantly decrease the internal shearing strength of the material.
Pore water pressure is monitored at the bottom of specimen.
consumption that took place in the soil pore water during this period.
In cases where the soil consists of loose granular materials and high water table, the tendency to get densified may result in the development of excess hydrostatic pore water pressures of sufficient magnitude to cause liquefaction of the soil, resulting in settlements and tilting of structures.