portal

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por·tal

 (pôr′tl)
n.
1. A doorway, entrance, or gate, especially one that is large and imposing.
2. An entrance or a means of entrance: the local library, a portal of knowledge.
3. The portal vein.
4. A website considered as an entry point to other websites, often by being or providing access to a search engine.
adj.
1. Of or relating to the portal vein or the portal system.
2. Of or relating to a point of entrance to an organ, especially the transverse fissure of the liver, through which the blood vessels enter.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin portāle, city gate, from neuter of portālis, of a gate, from Latin porta, gate; see per- in Indo-European roots. N., sense 3 and adj., from New Latin porta (hepatis), transverse fissure (of the liver), literally gate of the liver, perhaps ultimately translation of Akkadian bāb (ekalli), gate (of the palace), umbilical fissure of the liver (next to the transverse fissure).]

portal

(ˈpɔːtəl)
n
1. (Architecture) an entrance, gateway, or doorway, esp one that is large and impressive
2. any entrance or access to a place
3. (Telecommunications) computing an internet site providing links to other sites
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy
a. of or relating to a portal vein: hepatic portal system.
b. of or relating to a porta
[C14: via Old French from Medieval Latin portāle, from Latin porta gate, entrance]

por•tal1

(ˈpɔr tl, ˈpoʊr-)

n.
1. a door, gate, or entrance, esp. one of imposing size and appearance.
2. an iron or steel bent for bracing a framed structure, having curved braces between the vertical members and a horizontal member at the top.
3. an entrance to a tunnel or mine.
4. Computers. a Web site that functions as an entrance to the Internet, as by providing useful content and organizing various sites and features on the World Wide Web or other parts of the Internet.
[1300–50; < Medieval Latin, n. use of neuter of portālis of a gate]

por•tal2

(ˈpɔr tl, ˈpoʊr-)
Anat. adj.
1. noting or pertaining to the transverse fissure of the liver.
n.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin portālis of a gate. See port4, -al1]

portal

- An Internet site offering a directory of links to other sites.
See also related terms for links.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.portal - a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically)portal - a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically); "the portals of the cathedral"; "the portals of heaven"; "the portals of success"
entrance, entranceway, entryway, entree, entry - something that provides access (to get in or get out); "they waited at the entrance to the garden"; "beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral"
2.portal - a site that the owner positions as an entrance to other sites on the internet; "a portal typically has search engines and free email and chat rooms etc."
internet site, web site, website, site - a computer connected to the internet that maintains a series of web pages on the World Wide Web; "the Israeli web site was damaged by hostile hackers"
3.portal - a short vein that carries blood into the liver
portal system - system of veins that carry blood from the abdominal organs to the liver
vein, vena, venous blood vessel - a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart; "all veins except the pulmonary vein carry unaerated blood"

portal

noun (Literary) doorway, door, entry, way in, entrance, gateway, entrance way I entered through the royal portal.
Translations
portál
portaaliportti

portal

[ˈpɔːtl] Nportal m

portal

[ˈpɔːrtəl] n
(= entrance) → portail m
(COMPUTING) (= internet site) → portail mport authority nautorités fpl portuaires

portal

n (liter)Portal nt, → Pforte f (geh), → Tor nt; (Comput) → Portal nt

portal

[ˈpɔːtl] nportale m

por·tal

a. portal.
1. rel. al sistema portal;
2. rel. al punto de entrada de un microorganismo.

portal

adj portal; (vein) porta

portal

n portal m; patient — portal del paciente; — of entry portal de entrada
References in classic literature ?
As the devoted wife of a man who worshiped her, she felt she would take her place with a certain dignity in the world of reality, closing the portals forever behind her upon the realm of romance and dreams.
So sung The glorious Train ascending: He through Heav'n, That open'd wide her blazing Portals, led To Gods Eternal house direct the way, A broad and ample rode, whose dust is Gold And pavement Starrs, as Starrs to thee appeer, Seen in the Galaxie, that Milkie way Which nightly as a circling Zone thou seest Pouderd with Starrs.
At each of these portals were stationed two heralds, attended by six trumpets, as many pursuivants, and a strong body of men-at-arms for maintaining order, and ascertaining the quality of the knights who proposed to engage in this martial game.
Giry, burst into song again--" `Saint, unclose thy portals holy and accord the bliss, to a mortal bending lowly, of a pardon-kiss.
Writers there are who say the first adventure he met with was that of Puerto Lapice; others say it was that of the windmills; but what I have ascertained on this point, and what I have found written in the annals of La Mancha, is that he was on the road all day, and towards nightfall his hack and he found themselves dead tired and hungry, when, looking all around to see if he could discover any castle or shepherd's shanty where he might refresh himself and relieve his sore wants, he perceived not far out of his road an inn, which was as welcome as a star guiding him to the portals, if not the palaces, of his redemption; and quickening his pace he reached it just as night was setting in.
Already the two blacks stationed there were pushing the unwieldy portals to.
I was naturally most occupied with the growing crowd of little people, and with the big open portals that yawned before me shadowy and mysterious.
A sufficient time before he would have allowed the problem to kick its heels at the outer portals of his mind, but now he felt compelled to give serious attention to it.
The portals re-echoed with the sound, the bars held no longer, and the doors flew open, one one way, and the other the other, through the force of the blow.
Without knocking at the door, or in any way announcing our presence, I threw open the portals, and the Grandmother was borne through them in triumph.
He crossed one of the bridges and stood a moment in the empty place before the great cathedral; then he went in beneath the grossly-imaged portals.
Blunt lived presented itself to our eyes, narrow, silent, empty, and dark, but with enough gas-lamps in it to disclose its most striking feature: a quantity of flag-poles sticking out above many of its closed portals.