politeness

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po·lite

 (pə-līt′)
adj. po·lit·er, po·lit·est
1. Marked by or showing consideration for others and observance of accepted social usage.
2. Refined; elegant: polite society.

[Middle English polit, polished, from Latin polītus, past participle of polīre, to polish; see polish.]

po·lite′ly adv.
po·lite′ness n.
Synonyms: polite, mannerly, civil, courteous, genteel
These adjectives mean mindful of, conforming to, or marked by good manners. Polite and mannerly imply consideration for others and the adherence to conventional social standards of good behavior: "She was so polite and unwilling to offend that she wouldn't always make her feelings and intentions clear" (Jane Mayer and Jill Abramson)."Just the one young man came out, very mannerly, and helped first her then me down from the car" (Alice Munro).
Civil often suggests the barest observance of accepted social usages, as in the avoidance of rudeness: "Mr. Bingley was unaffectedly civil in his answer, and forced his younger sister to be civil also, and say what the occasion required" (Jane Austen).
Courteous implies courtliness and dignity: "Even around his parents ... he's unfailingly courteous and even-tempered, letting slide their mild attempts to run his life" (Paul Solotaroff).
Genteel, which originally meant well-bred, now usually suggests excessive and affected refinement associated with the upper classes: "In a world without credit bureaus, background checks, or official identification, properly genteel attire, speech, and behavior determined where a person could go, whom he could see, and how he was judged in every area" (Jeffrey L. Pasley).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.politeness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usagepoliteness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usage
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
impoliteness - a discourteous manner that ignores accepted social usage
2.politeness - the act of showing regard for others
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
courtesy - a courteous or respectful or considerate act
deference, respect - a courteous expression (by word or deed) of esteem or regard; "his deference to her wishes was very flattering"; "be sure to give my respects to the dean"
devoir - formal expression of respect

politeness

noun courtesy, decency, correctness, etiquette, deference, grace, civility, graciousness, common courtesy, complaisance, courteousness, respectfulness, mannerliness, obligingness She listened to him, but only out of politeness.
Quotations
"Politeness is organized indifference" [Paul Valéry Tel Quel]

politeness

noun
1. Well-mannered behavior toward others:
2. A courteous act or courteous acts that contribute to smoothness and ease in dealings and social relationships
amenity (used in plural), civility, courtesy, pleasantry, propriety (used in plural).
Translations
أدَب، تَهْذيبكِيَاسَة
zdvořilost
høflighedvelopdragenhed
kohteliaisuus
pristojnost
kurteisi
丁寧
정중함
vljudnost
artighet
ความสุภาพอ่อนโยน
vẻ lịch sự

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] Ncortesía f, educación f
to do sth out of politenesshacer algo por cortesía

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] npolitesse f
to do sth out of politeness → faire qch par politesse

politeness

nHöflichkeit f

politeness

[pəˈlaɪtnɪs] neducazione f, cortesia

polite

(pəˈlait) adjective
having or showing good manners; courteous. a polite child; a polite apology.
poˈlitely adverb
poˈliteness noun

politeness

كِيَاسَة zdvořilost høflighed Höflichkeit ευγένεια cortesía kohteliaisuus politesse pristojnost cortesia 丁寧 정중함 beleefdheid høflighet grzeczność gentileza вежливость artighet ความสุภาพอ่อนโยน kibarlık vẻ lịch sự 有礼
References in periodicals archive ?
Kopytko provides statistics for the frequencies of the individual strategies and he concludes that the world of Shakespeare's plays is largely a positive politeness culture, which he contrasts to the largely negative politeness culture of Present-day English (Kopytko 1995: 532).
For example, seeking agreement and avoiding disagreement constitutes an important positive politeness strategy for enhancing rapport (Brown & Levinson, 1987).
The technique consists of engaging interlocutors in dialogues (Dolinski, Nawrat, & Rudak, 2001; Sanders & Fitch, 2001), as opposed to making requests in the form of monologues, by using a combination of positive politeness (i.
Brown and Levinson categorize politeness as either positive politeness or negative politeness and tie both strategies to the importance of face in every culture.
Positive politeness emphasizes belonging to a group and corporativism, that is, it stresses unity and reduces distance.
Positive politeness, for example, is oriented toward the positive face of the hearer, i.
Specifically, positive politeness strategies refer to the acts that we initiate to protect each other's positive face wants, i.
Such expectation and practice may well be present in a Western culture, for example, the UK, and can be perceived as a positive politeness strategy within Brown and Levinson's framework since failure to do so inevitably induces FTAs to both the talk initiator and the addressee, whatever cultural context it may be.
In Shakespeare's plays positive politeness strategies are rather dominant.
However, the less formal use of keqi within close intimate relationships does not mean that people are not polite to their close relationships, but they communicate politeness differently, such as showing attitudinal warmth described by Gu (1990) or using Brown and Levinson's positive politeness strategies (i.

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