reconstruction

(redirected from Post-Civil War Reconstruction)
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re·con·struc·tion

 (rē′kən-strŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act or result of reconstructing.
2. Reconstruction The period (1865-1877) during which the states that had seceded to the Confederacy were controlled by the federal government before being readmitted to the Union.

Reconstruction

(ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃən)
n
(Historical Terms) history US the period after the Civil War when the South was reorganized and reintegrated into the Union (1865–77)

re•con•struc•tion

(ˌri kənˈstrʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of reconstructing.
2. (cap.)
a. the process by which the states that had seceded were reorganized as part of the Union after the Civil War.
b. the period during which this took place, 1865–77.
[1785–95]
re`con•struc′tion•al, re`con•struc′tion•ar′y, adj.

Reconstruction

The political process by which the southern states were restored to the Union.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reconstruction - the period after the American Civil War when the southern states were reorganized and reintegrated into the UnionReconstruction - the period after the American Civil War when the southern states were reorganized and reintegrated into the Union; 1865-1877
2.reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
fixing, repair, mend, mending, reparation, fix, fixture - the act of putting something in working order again
makeover - a complete reconstruction and renovation of something; "the blighted neighborhood underwent a total makeover"
reassembly, refabrication - assembling again
re-formation, regeneration - forming again (especially with improvements or removal of defects); renewing and reconstituting
rebuilding - building again
3.reconstruction - an interpretation formed by piecing together bits of evidence
interpretation - an explanation that results from interpreting something; "the report included his interpretation of the forensic evidence"
4.reconstruction - recall that is hypothesized to work by storing abstract features which are then used to construct the memory during recall
recollection, reminiscence, recall - the process of remembering (especially the process of recovering information by mental effort); "he has total recall of the episode"

reconstruction

noun
1. rebuilding, reform, restoration, remake, remodelling, regeneration, renovation, reorganization, re-creation, re-establishment America's part in the post-war reconstruction of Germany.
2. re-enactment, account, piecing-together a reconstruction of her ordeal
Translations
إعادَة بِناء
rekonstrukce
rekonstruktion
rekonstruktiorekonstruointi
rekonstrukcióújjáépítés
endurgerî
yeniden tasarlama

reconstruction

[ˈriːkənˈstrʌkʃən] Nreconstrucción f

reconstruction

[ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃən] n
(= renewal, reinvigoration) [country] → reconstruction f
(= rebuilding) [building, road, city] → reconstruction f
(= recreation) [crime, event] → reconstitution f
(MEDICINE) [breast, face] → reconstruction f

reconstruction

nRekonstruktion f; (of city, building)Wiederaufbau m

reconstruction

[ˌriːkənˈstrʌkʃn] nricostruzione f

reconstruct

(riːkənˈstrakt) verb
to create a complete description or idea, on the basis of certain known facts. Let us try to reconstruct the crime.
ˌreconˈstruction (-ʃən) noun

re·con·struc·tion

v. reconstrucción.

reconstruction

n reconstrucción f
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapters chronicle labor and solidarity movements among both ethno-racial communities, from the post-Civil War Reconstruction to the Gilded Age, the Great Depression, the Civil Rights era, and beyond.
An obvious example is the Jim Crow South, where white legislatures passed laws imposing racial segregation and reversing many of the gains of the post-Civil War Reconstruction period.
He matures into manhood during the post-Civil War reconstruction period and with the unrest of a land that just lost a war and is filled with bandits and social strife.
Today, higher education looks at a key chapter in its evolution in the United States, as the nation's historically Black colleges across the South trace their roots to people and politics of those three key 1866 to 1868 post-Civil War Reconstruction years.
In this book, editor Richard Zuczek has collected contributions from several leading historians on the post-Civil War reconstruction of the Southern United States.

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