Post-Impressionism

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Post-Im•pres•sion•ism

(ˌpoʊst ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
(sometimes l.c.) a varied development of Impressionism by a group of painters, chiefly between 1880 and 1900, stressing formal structure or the possibilities of form and color.
[1905–10]
Post`-Im•pres′sion•ist, adj., n.
Post`-Im•pres`sion•is′tic, adj.

Post-Impressionism

a late 19th-century reaction to Impressionism, emphasizing on one hand the emotional aspect of painting and on the other a return to formal structure; the first led to Expressionism; the second, to Cubism. — Post-Impressionist, n.
See also: Art

post-impressionism

(c. 1880–1910) A term loosely applied to a diverse group of artists whose paintings developed from Impressionism and who worked in widely divergent styles, e.g. Gauguin and Matisse.
Translations

post-impressionism

[ˈpəʊstɪmˈpreʃənɪzəm] Nposimpresionismo m
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References in periodicals archive ?
Before the students began painting, I demonstrated Vincent's post-Impressionistic style and dash-brushstroke techniques.
1934) reveals his awareness of Impressionism's tenets, especially the juxtaposition of complementary colors, while delineating the subject in a more solid post-Impressionistic manner.
Which post-impressionistic technique was used by Seurat?
The purpose is to introduce the works of Vincent van Gogh, and to discuss his Post-Impressionistic style.
Started last July, the medium is acrylic paint on nylon canvas and the style is post-impressionistic.
For the most part, the Italianate outpourings found in, say, Resurrezione were replaced by a more Gallic, post-impressionistic style characterized by a certain understatement or restraint.
Students in art and math classes at Boyceville High School recreated Georges Seurat's famous post-impressionistic painting, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, in life-sized proportions in a park on the banks of a small stream in Western Wisconsin.