posthole

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post·hole

 (pōst′hōl′)
n.
A hole dug in the ground to hold a fence post.

posthole

(ˈpəʊstˌhəʊl)
n
a hole dug in the ground to hold a post
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.posthole - a hole dug in the ground to hold a fence post
hole - an opening deliberately made in or through something
References in periodicals archive ?
At least two other installations were placed on these floors, including a mudbrick-lined fireplace, and a feature with two identical postholes placed close to each other.
Other marks in the quarry face are beginning to reveal the work methods associated with extracting the blocks--these include rope holes, foot holes, and postholes that would have held the scaffolding and helped the workers to work the faces to a considerable height--the quarry contains faces as high as 40 meters.
I'd dug postholes by hand over the years for things like gates, decks and small fences around the house, and I'd driven my share of metal fence posts for wire fences, but the thought of digging all those 6- and 8-inch posts by hand had me a little apprehensive.
Most of the features found were postholes for a building.
Anyone who has used a hand post auger to make postholes knows it is not an enjoyable job.
Beneath these walls, the marks left by postholes tell us that the first occupation of Doha was made of palm front buildings -- wood and palm front structures.
No postholes were discovered during the excavation of these structures suggesting that they may have had simple reed quincha walls supported is a similar way to the walls of the structure in Unit 1.
Postholes and burnt mud plaster encircling the circumference of the interior pit wall of the structure provided evidence of a substantial timber super-structure used to roof the building.
However-much detail has been preserved in the larger barrow: structural timbers in carbonized form, postholes showing the positions of uprights, and the burnt remains of stakes forming internal partitions.
Begin building your pergola by marking six posthole locations using spikes pushed into the ground, then dig oversized postholes that are 24 to 48 inches deep.
Used to build houses, these postholes are evidence for the other first major step in making mankind independent of the Environment by putting a roof over its head.
Stand up the arbor exactly where you want it and mark the locations of the postholes.