pothole

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Related to Potholers: spelunk

pot·hole

 (pŏt′hōl′)
n.
1. A hole or pit, especially one in a road surface. Also called chuckhole.
2. A deep round hole worn in rock by loose stones whirling in strong rapids or waterfalls.
3. Western US A place filled with mud or quicksand that is a hazard to cattle.

pot′holed′ adj.

pothole

(ˈpɒtˌhəʊl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) geography
a. a deep hole in limestone areas resulting from action by running water. See also sinkhole1
b. a circular hole in the bed of a river produced by abrasion
2. (Physical Geography) a deep hole, esp one produced in a road surface by wear or weathering

pot•hole

(ˈpɒtˌhoʊl)

n.
1. a hole formed in pavement, as by excessive use or by extremes of weather.
2. a hole cut in submerged bedrock by the erosive action of gravel whirled about by eddying water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pothole - a pit or hole produced by wear or weathering (especially in a road surface)pothole - a pit or hole produced by wear or weathering (especially in a road surface)
hollow, hole - a depression hollowed out of solid matter
Translations
حُفْرَةحُفْرَة في الطَّريقنُقْرَه ، حُفْرَة في صَخْر بِفِعل الماء
výmolobří hrnec
huljættegryde
kuoppahiidenkirnu
rupa na cesti
kátyú
hola/hvarf í vegiskessuketill
ポットホール
팬 구멍
krasová priepasťobrí hrniec
tjälskott
หลุมบ่อ
yol çukurudüşey mağarakasisobruk
ổ gà

pothole

[ˈpɒthəʊl] N
1. (in road) → bache m
2. (Geol) → marmita f de gigante, gruta f; (loosely) → cueva f, caverna f, profunda gruta f

pothole

[ˈpɒthəʊl] n
(in road)nid-de-poule m
(= underground cave) → puits mpot-holed potholed [ˈpɒthəʊld] adj [road] → plein(e) de nids-de-poule

pothole

[ˈpɒtˌhəʊl] n (in road) → buca (Brit) (Geol) → marmitta

pot

(pot) noun
any one of many kinds of deep container used in cooking, for holding food, liquids etc or for growing plants. a cooking-pot; a plant-pot; a jam-pot; The waiter brought her a pot of tea.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈpotted
to plant in a pot.
ˈpotted adjective
1. (of food) pressed into a pot or jar in order to preserve it. potted meat.
2. contained in a pot. a potted plant.
3. brief; summarized. a potted history of Britain.
ˈpothole noun
1. a hole or cave made in rock by the action of swirling water.
2. a hole worn in a road-surface.
ˈpot-shot noun
an easy or casual shot that doesn't need careful aim. He took a pot-shot at a bird on the fence.
take pot luck
to take whatever happens to be available, eg as an unexpected guest at a meal-time.

pothole

حُفْرَة výmol hul Schlagloch λακκούβα cueva subterránea kuoppa nid-de-poule rupa na cesti cavità ポットホール 팬 구멍 putje hull wybój buraco выбоина tjälskott หลุมบ่อ yol çukuru ổ gà 坑洼
References in periodicals archive ?
To that end, Hai Karate's bespectacled gent desperately fought off the advances of a woman with a cleavage potholers would find challenging.
Reaching the remains required a team of slim female potholers to fit through the cave's entrance.
All three potholers were initially found alive on Saturday morning, several days after they had gone missing after breaking off from a group of nine Spaniards to explore different caves.
55PM Quality British horror film in which six adventurous potholers find themselves trapped in an uncharted cave.
In the same category come potholers and those peculiar types who go metal detecting.
The school depends on the extraordinary network of talented and highly qualified climbers, potholers and mountain guides for which the area is renowned, to support its activities.
Should the NHS fund the care of smokers, potholers, skiers and others who make risky lifestyle choices?
Potholers, mountaineers, ramblers, sailors and people who indulge in extreme sports often need rescuing.
It's about a group of female potholers who get lost in an uncharted cave system in the Appalachian mountains only to discover they aren't alone and something sinister is moving up ahead in the dark.
This is hard hat and strong boots territory for lovers of outdoor pursuits: rock climbers test their skills on sea cliffs at Ailladie and potholers use Doolin, a striking little tourist village, to explore the legendary Cliffs of Mohar.
This is hard hat and strong boots territory for lovers of outdoor pursuits: rock climbers test their skills on sea cliffs at Ailladie while potholers use Doolin, a striking little tourist village, to explore the legendary Cliffs of Moher.
The rocky crags and caves attract climbers and potholers from across the globe and green valleys are popular with walkers.