Potiphar

(redirected from Potiphar's wife)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Pot·i·phar

 (pŏt′ə-fər)
n.
In the Bible, an officer of the Pharaoh who bought Joseph as a slave and later imprisoned him when Potiphar's wife falsely accused Joseph of rape.

[Hebrew pôṭîpar, from Egyptian p-di-p-r', the one whom Ra gave : p-, definite article + di, whom he gave + r', Ra.]

Potiphar

(ˈpɒtɪfə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament one of Pharaoh's officers, who bought Joseph as a slave (Genesis 37:36)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Potiphar's wife tried to seduce the young man, and when he refused, she accused him of rape.
It was even released in video format in 1999 with David Attenborough and Joan Collins playing Jacob and Potiphar's wife respectively.
Neeme Jarvi and the orchestra sound as if they love it too, revelling in the lush eroticism of the attempted seduction of Joseph by Potiphar's wife (shades of Salome).
Joseph's dramatic encounter with Potiphar's wife is related in Genesis 39:7-23.
Joseph" is a dramatic monologue which lambasts the hypocrisy of Potiphar's wife virtue which the poet likened to "tattered pieces of masquerade of virtue".
Mann gives us a portrait of Potiphar's wife, named (Mut-em-enet), humanized, and vivacious.
2) These connect it to the biblical tale of Joseph and Potiphar's wife, a similarity which has often been discussed (see the bibliographies in Lichtheim and Simpson), but not by Wickett.
It offers us (1) chapters on warnings about sexual misbehavior, a list of wrongdoing by the Watchers, Ham and Noah, Abraham, Sarai and Pharaoh, Circumcision, and the sin of Lot/destruction of Sodom; (2) chapters on the problems of Intermarriage and Rape: Dinah, Reuben and Bilhah, Joseph and Potiphar's wife, Noah and his progeny, Abraham and his progeny, Isaac and Jacob and their progeny, and an essay on the language of sexual misbehavior; and (3) chapters on such questions as creation and marriage, Abraham and Sarah, Rebecca and Isaac, and Jacob, Leah, and Rachel.
It offers us 1) chapters on warnings about sexual misbehavior; a list of wrongdoing by the Watchers; Ham and Noah; Abraham, Sarai, and Pharaoh; circumcision; and the sin of Lot/destruction of Sodom; 2) chapters on the problems of intermarriage and rape: Dinah, Reuben, and Bilhah, Joseph and Potiphar's wife, Noah and his progeny, Abraham and his progeny, Isaac and Jacob and their progeny, and an essay on the language of sexual misbehavior; and 3) chapters on such questions as creation and marriage, Abraham and Sarah, Rebecca and Isaac, and Jacob, Leah, and Rachel.
Paul's own acting ambitions began when he was cast as Potiphar's wife in a school production of Joseph's Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat when he was about 10.
The story of Joseph and Potiphar's wife is usually tagged as either a brief, if salacious, folktale in literary discussion of the Bible or presented as a moral admonition.
4) There is something about the situation in Faulkner's "Dry September" that reaches beyond that area south of the Mason-Dixon line and into the heart of humanity as a whole, showing up in texts as varied as the book of Genesis, wherein Potiphar's wife accuses Joseph of raping her after he rejects her sexual advances, and E.