apophasis

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Related to Praeteritio: apophasis

a·poph·a·sis

 (ə-pŏf′ə-sĭs)
n.
Allusion to something by denying that it will be mentioned, as in I will not bring up my opponent's questionable financial dealings.

[Late Latin, from Greek, from apophanai, to say no : apo-, apo- + phanai, to say; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

apophasis

(əˈpɒfəsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the device of mentioning a subject by stating that it will not be mentioned: I shall not discuss his cowardice or his treachery.
[C17: via Latin from Greek: denial, from apo- + phanai to say]

apophasis

- Mentioning a subject by saying one is not going to mention it.
See also related terms for mention.

apophasis

a spoken or written figure in which an assertion is made in the midst of a denial, as in Mark Antony’s funeral speech for Caesar. Also called paralipsis. — apophasic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

apophasis

The deliberate mentioning of a subject by saying that it will not be mentioned.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apophasis - mentioning something by saying it will not be mentioned
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
References in periodicals archive ?
La praeteritio clausura la enumeracion: "De otras muchas no dire, / que en admirables extremos / famosas las conocemos / de quien la Historia da fe" (vv.
Crucially, the description is negated; the poet does not want to name everything in detail and yet, in employing the praeteritio, does so.
In this final paragraph, I also identify two other figures of thought that accentuate the essayist's argument: the first is praeteritio, which mentions something that the writer does not want to say, as when Woolf explicitly declares that "there is no need for me .
I 1 nel quale Sidonio afferma di seguire come modelli Plinio il Giovane e Simmaco e menziona Cicerone in una praeteritio.
Praeteritio allows a speaker to have it both ways: while claiming to omit, he actually gets to express.
The literary form of the Horti, which imitates Virgil's Georgics in general, is analyzed as far as metrics, division into several books, extent, communicative situation, paratexts, prooemium, praeteritio of medicinal plants, aitiological epyllion, and sphragis are concerned (66-99).
In addition, they present a frequent recourse to ellipsis or reticence, aposiopesis (unfinished sentences, suspension dots) and praeteritio (false silence).
The Chorus's introduction of the noverca through the rhetorical device of praeteritio (quid plura canam?
Suffice here to recall the eidetic force of his descriptions, the ever-surprising originality and justness of his similes and metaphors, the light-handed shading of narration into meditation and vice versa, the exquisite handling of iteratio, variation, and praeteritio, the three figures of speech that have come to be a sort of trademark of his style.
At the beginning of his story introducing Neaira for the first time (19-20), Apollodorus gives the names of all the seven girls who, as he says, worked for Nicarete, while he bypasses the details of their subsequent manumissions with a praeteritio implying that he possesses full knowledge about the girls' subsequent careers.
For example, van Eemeren and Houtlosser (2000) pointed to rhetorical figures such as praeteritio, concilliatio, and prolepsis for their role in argumentative discourse, and Rigotti (2006) discusses the use of topics or topoi in the study of argumentation and contextual factors.
The fallacies and figures sections include basic examples of each including antithesis, anaphora, praeteritio, and prolepsis to name a few.