prairie dog

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prairie dog

n.
Any of several burrowing rodents of the genus Cynomys, having light brown fur and a warning call that sounds similar to a dog's bark. Prairie dogs lives in large colonies, chiefly in the Great Plains of North America.

prairie dog

n
(Animals) any of several gregarious sciurine rodents of the genus Cynomys, such as C. ludovicianus, that live in large complex burrows in the prairies of North America. Also called: prairie marmot

prai′rie dog`


n.
any burrowing squirrel of the genus Cynomys, of W North American and N Mexican plains and prairies, having a barklike cry.
[1765–75, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prairie dog - any of several rodents of North American prairies living in large complex burrows having a barking cryprairie dog - any of several rodents of North American prairies living in large complex burrows having a barking cry
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
Cynomys, genus Cynomys - prairie dogs
Translations
chien de prairie

prairie dog

ncane m delle praterie
References in classic literature ?
Sometimes I rode north to the big prairie-dog town to watch the brown earth-owls fly home in the late afternoon and go down to their nests underground with the dogs.
They kept him in their hole and fed him for the same reason that the prairie-dogs and the brown owls house the rattlesnakes-- because they did not know how to get rid of him.
In one direction from my house there was a colony of muskrats in the river meadows; under the grove of elms and buttonwoods in the other horizon was a village of busy men, as curious to me as if they had been prairie-dogs, each sitting at the mouth of its burrow, or running over to a neighbor's to gossip.
During the mating season mature bulls join cow herds in and around the prairie-dog towns that parallel the Little Missouri River.
As prairie-dog populations shrank, other animals that depended on them, besides blackfooted ferrets, also disappeared.
Slobodchikoff calls the alarm calls a "Rosetta stone" in decoding prairie-dog language, because they occur in a context people can understand, enabling interpretation.
Wind-induced ventilation of the burrow of the prairie-dog, Cynomys ludovicianus.
Additionally, varmint hunters who travel to prairie-dog shoots require good optics, high-performance rounds and shooting benches.