prairie

(redirected from Prairies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Prairies: Canadian Prairies

prai·rie

 (prâr′ē)
n.
An extensive flat or rolling area dominated by grasses, especially the grasslands that once covered much of central North America.

[French, from Old French praierie, from Vulgar Latin *prātāria, from Latin prāta, meadow.]

prairie

(ˈprɛərɪ)
n
(Physical Geography) (often plural) a treeless grassy plain of the central US and S Canada. Compare pampas, steppe, savanna
[C18: from French, from Old French praierie, from Latin prātum meadow]

prai•rie

(ˈprɛər i)

n.
1. an extensive, level or undulating, mostly treeless tract of land esp. in the Mississippi valley, orig. covered with coarse grasses.
2. a tract of grassland; meadow.
[1675–85; < French: meadow < Vulgar Latin *prātāria= Latin prāt(um) meadow + -āria, feminine of -ārius -ary]

prai·rie

(prâr′ē)
An extensive area of flat or rolling grassland, especially the large plain of central North America.

prairie

An extensive open area of flat grassland, especially in the central plains of North America.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prairie - a treeless grassy plainprairie - a treeless grassy plain    
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
Translations
prérie
prærie
preeria
prerija
préri
gresja
prerija
prērija
ağaçsız geniş çayırlık ova

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ]
A. Npradera f, llanura f, pampa f (LAm)
the Prairies (US) → las Grandes Llanuras
B. CPD prairie dog Nperro m de las praderas
prairie oyster N (US) huevo crudo y sazonado que se toma en una bebida alcohólica
prairie wolf Ncoyote m

prairie

[ˈprɛəri] nprairie f
the prairies → la Prairieprairie dog nchien m de prairie

prairie

nGrassteppe f; (in North America) → Prärie f

prairie

:
prairie chicken
n (US) → Präriehuhn nt
prairie dog
nPräriehund m
prairie oyster
nPrärieauster f
prairie schooner
nPlanwagen m
prairie wolf
nPräriewolf m

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ] nprateria
the prairies → le grandi praterie

prairie

(ˈpreəri) noun
(often in plural) in North America, an area of flat, treeless, grass-covered land.
References in classic literature ?
Departure from Fort Osage Modes of transportation Pack- horses Wagons Walker and Cerre; their characters Buoyant feelings on launching upon the prairies Wild equipments of the trappers Their gambols and antics Difference of character between the American and French trappers Agency of the Kansas General Clarke White Plume, the Kansas chief Night scene in a trader's camp Colloquy between White Plume and the captain Bee- hunters Their expeditions Their feuds with the Indians Bargaining talent of White Plume
The chief difficulty occurs in passing the deep ravines cut through the prairies by streams and winter torrents.
The wagons, also, would be more easily defended, and might form a kind of fortification in case of attack in the open prairies.
It was a great object with Captain Bonneville to get to the mountains before the summer heats and summer flies should render the travelling across the prairies distressing; and before the annual assemblages of people connected with the fur trade should have broken up, and dispersed to the hunting grounds.
He chose entirely new scenes for it, "resolved to cross the Mississippi and wander over the desolate wastes of the remote Western prairies.
Precaution, 1820; The Spy, 1821; The Pioneers, 1823; The Pilot, 1823; Lionel Lincoln, or the Leaguer of Boston, 1825; The Last of the Mohicans, 1826; The Prairie, 1827; The Red Rover, 1828; Notions of the Americans, 1828; The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish, 1829; The Water-witch,
This broad but shallow stream flows for an immense distance through a wide and verdant valley scooped out of boundless prairies.
These often take the precaution to set the prairies on fire behind them to conceal their traces from their enemies.
The Omahas were once one of the numerous and powerful tribes of the prairies, vying in warlike might and prowess with the Sioux, the Pawnees, the Sauks, the Konsas, and the Iatans.
At one time, when pursuing a war party by their tracks across the prairies, he repeatedly discharged his rifle into the prints made by their feet and by the hoofs of their horses, assuring his followers that he would thereby cripple the fugitives, so that they would easily be overtaken.
Almost every day she came running across the prairie to have her reading lesson with me.
He lives on the sea, as prairie cocks in the prairie; he hides among the waves, he climbs them as chamois hunters climb the Alps.