prairie

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Related to Prairies: Canadian Prairies

prai·rie

 (prâr′ē)
n.
An extensive flat or rolling area dominated by grasses, especially the grasslands that once covered much of central North America.

[French, from Old French praierie, from Vulgar Latin *prātāria, from Latin prāta, meadow.]

prairie

(ˈprɛərɪ)
n
(Physical Geography) (often plural) a treeless grassy plain of the central US and S Canada. Compare pampas, steppe, savanna
[C18: from French, from Old French praierie, from Latin prātum meadow]

prai•rie

(ˈprɛər i)

n.
1. an extensive, level or undulating, mostly treeless tract of land esp. in the Mississippi valley, orig. covered with coarse grasses.
2. a tract of grassland; meadow.
[1675–85; < French: meadow < Vulgar Latin *prātāria= Latin prāt(um) meadow + -āria, feminine of -ārius -ary]

prai·rie

(prâr′ē)
An extensive area of flat or rolling grassland, especially the large plain of central North America.

prairie

An extensive open area of flat grassland, especially in the central plains of North America.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prairie - a treeless grassy plainprairie - a treeless grassy plain    
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
Translations
prérie
prærie
preeria
prerija
préri
gresja
prerija
prērija
ağaçsız geniş çayırlık ova

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ]
A. Npradera f, llanura f, pampa f (LAm)
the Prairies (US) → las Grandes Llanuras
B. CPD prairie dog Nperro m de las praderas
prairie oyster N (US) huevo crudo y sazonado que se toma en una bebida alcohólica
prairie wolf Ncoyote m

prairie

[ˈprɛəri] nprairie f
the prairies → la Prairieprairie dog nchien m de prairie

prairie

nGrassteppe f; (in North America) → Prärie f

prairie

:
prairie chicken
n (US) → Präriehuhn nt
prairie dog
nPräriehund m
prairie oyster
nPrärieauster f
prairie schooner
nPlanwagen m
prairie wolf
nPräriewolf m

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ] nprateria
the prairies → le grandi praterie

prairie

(ˈpreəri) noun
(often in plural) in North America, an area of flat, treeless, grass-covered land.
References in classic literature ?
Your deer are much prettier than our ugly buffaloes," she said, turning to the prairies for help and feeling glad that she had read one of the boys' books in which Jo delighted.
The writer remembers to have been present at an interview between two chiefs of the Great Prairies west of the Mississippi, and when an interpreter was in attendance who spoke both their languages.
Go visit the Prairies in June, when for scores on scores of miles you wade knee-deep among Tiger-lilies--what is the one charm wanting?
Comparing the humped herds of whales with the humped herds of buffalo, which, not forty years ago, overspread by tens of thousands the prairies of Illinois and Missouri, and shook their iron manes and scowled with their thunder-clotted brows upon the sites of populous river-capitals, where now the polite broker sells you land at a dollar an inch; in such a comparison an irresistible argument would seem furnished, to show that the hunted whale cannot now escape speedy extinction.
A truly good book is something as natural, and as unexpectedly and unaccountably fair and perfect, as a wild-flower discovered on the prairies of the West or in the jungles of the East.
A gigantic eruption, like that of Krakatoa a few years ago, with the accompanying earthquakes, tidal waves, and clouds of volcanic dust, changes the face of the surrounding landscape beyond recognition, bringing down the high lands, elevating the low, making fair lakes where deserts had been, and deserts where green prairies had smiled before.
They girdled the mountains and basted the prairies with wire, until the lonely places were brought together and made sociable.
We've told yarns by the campfire in the prairies, and dressed one another's wounds after trying a landing at the Marquesas, and drunk healths on the shore of Titicaca.
My flocks, like those of Neptune's old shepherds, graze fearlessly in the immense prairies of the ocean.
The road grew, on the prairies, a mile and a half a day.
Departure from Fort Osage Modes of transportation Pack- horses Wagons Walker and Cerre; their characters Buoyant feelings on launching upon the prairies Wild equipments of the trappers Their gambols and antics Difference of character between the American and French trappers Agency of the Kansas General Clarke White Plume, the Kansas chief Night scene in a trader's camp Colloquy between White Plume and the captain Bee- hunters Their expeditions Their feuds with the Indians Bargaining talent of White Plume
About two years ago, not long after my return from a tour upon the prairies of the far West, I had a conversation with my friend, Mr.