Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood


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Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood

(1848–56) Founded by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, this group sought to recapture the innocence and beauty of Italian forms before Raphael, in protest against what they saw as the prevailing “frivolity” of art of their day.
References in classic literature ?
Millais, and the three formed the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, in which Rossetti, whose disposition throughout his life was extremely self-assertive, or even domineering, took the lead.
Steve Bell, the current owner of Brackenden House, said: "James Leathart was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, a collection of painters and patrons.
In this article, I will examine how this ideal of an art modeled on science was realized in the poetry written by the members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and their early associates.
Another invocation of Ruskin, in the context of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, suggests the right direction.
I was educated on the pre-Raphaelite brotherhood most of the way home
That included He Kills Coppers, a BBC biopic about Frankie Howerd and Desperate Romantics about the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood.
He is up for an award at the glittering awards show tonight for his work on the acclaimed series about rebellious 19th century pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood artists, which starred Aidan Turner, Rafe Spall and rising star Amy Manson.
Birmingham Museum And Art Gallery has a mouth-watering collection of work by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, including the largest collection in the world of the works of the city's very own Edward Burne-Jones.
Controversial painter William Holman Hunt (Rafe Spall) is a founding member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, who sticks up two fingers to the establishment.
The six-part series is set in London and follows the adventures of three men who would become one of Britain's most important art movements, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.
Stressing the significance of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood on nineteenth-century art and on Wharton's work, Orlando contends that these painters' popularity and the impact of their overly sexualized portrayals of women, as well as their infatuation with aestheticized depictions of women's deaths, provided Wharton with a basis from which to critique the portrayal of women's bodies in the culture at large.