pre-industrial

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pre-industrial

adjvorindustriell
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Because Middle-earth is a pre-industrial society, all of the props were designed to appear handmade and unique.
Boyce often refers to, but could have discussed more systematically, pre-industrial society and relies on older works for his conception of that society.
And not only was Greece off limits: Foucault's larger point was that we have no right to impose contemporary notions of "gay" or "homosexual" on the belief systems of any pre-industrial society.
But unlike some historians who celebrate the competitive commercial economy of pre-industrial society, Weise posits a darker side, arguing that this republican ideology of independence made Appalachians vulnerable to exploitation by railroad, timber and coal companies when they begin to develop the region in the late nineteenth century.
A co-operative, self-sufficient, pre-industrial society developed with its own language and rich cultural traditions.
In the late 1970s he began working on early modern elites, publishing Rzadzacy i rzadzeni (Governing and Governed, 1986), an analysis of the different systems of government in late medieval and early modern Europe, followed by Klientela (1994), a study of the relations between patrons and clients in the pre-industrial society.
The education authorities' national secretary, Charles Nolda, said: "We are approaching the 21st century still operating a school year based on a pre-industrial society.
William Mitchell, the dean of the MIT School of Architecture and Design, gave a terrific keynote speech on how much a post-industrial society, with more people able to work from their homes in a distributed economy, will look a lot more like pre-industrial society, with its artisans living and working in the same mixed-use neighborhoods.
observes, in any pre-industrial society there are few who enjoy the freedom from productive labor needed to undertake such a devotional regime.
One is to describe a segment of the pre-industrial society that has remained in the shadow of history, and in this he succeeds remarkably.
From the 1840s to the 1870s, the building served as the central site in a patriarchal, pre-industrial society that had recently shifted the core of its local politics from yeomen to planters, and its local economy from subsistence production for local needs to cotton planting aimed at markets in the northeast and Europe.
Like in any other pre-industrial society, power relations in 18th century Spain were determined by the functioning of extensive networks of patrons and clients.