Precambrian

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Pre·cam·bri·an

 (prē-kăm′brē-ən, -kām′-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the geologic time period between Hadean Time and the Cambrian Period, often subdivided into the Archean and Proterozoic Eras, comprising most of the earth's history and marked by the appearance of primitive forms of life. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Precambrian Eon.

Precambrian

(priːˈkæmbrɪən) or

Pre-Cambrian

adj
(Geological Science) of, denoting, or formed in the earliest geological era, which lasted for about 4 000 000 000 years before the Cambrian period
n
(Geological Science) the Precambrian the Precambrian era. See Archaeozoic, Proterozoic

Pre•cam•bri•an

or Pre-Cam•bri•an

(priˈkæm bri ən, -ˈkeɪm-)
adj.
1. noting or pertaining to the earliest era of earth history, ending 570 million years ago, during which the earth's crust formed and life first appeared in the seas.
n.
2. the Precambrian Era.
[1860–65]

Pre·cam·bri·an

(prē-kăm′brē-ən, prē-kām′brē-ən)
The span of geologic time between Hadean Time and the Phanerozoic Eon, from about 3.8 billion to 540 million years ago. During the Precambrian Eon, which is divided into the Archean and Proterozoic, primitive forms of life first appeared on Earth. See Chart at geologic time.

Precambrian

The period containing all of Earth’s history before the Cambrian period.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Precambrian - the eon following the Hadean time and preceding the Phanerozoic eon; from about 3,800 million years ago until 544 million years ago
Proterozoic, Proterozoic aeon, Proterozoic eon - from 2,500 to 544 million years ago; bacteria and fungi; primitive multicellular organisms
Archaeozoic, Archaeozoic aeon, Archean, Archean aeon, Archean eon, Archeozoic, Archeozoic eon - the time from 3,800 million years to 2,500 million years ago; earth's crust formed; unicellular organisms are earliest forms of life
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Mauritia may have been a dry piece of land for millions of years, stretching past even the time of the dinosaurs back to the Precambrian era, when life was likely absent from land.
However, they failed to succeed in sustaining growth and continuity of achievements in the long run, due to the severe depletion of nonrenewable fresh fossil water reserved in underground aquifers from the Precambrian era, which extended from the origin of the earth to about 570 million years ago.
The finding is significant, because similar fossil grooves and furrows found from the Precambrian era, as early as 1.