Precisianist


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Pre`ci´sian`ist


n.1.A precisian.
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Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion & Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), 110-17.
Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion and Antinomian Backlash to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996), 105-80.
145-83; Charles Lloyd Cohen, God's Caress: The Psychology of Puritan Religious Experience (New York, 1986); Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion and Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 2004), especially Ch.
157) On this point, see also Bozeman, Precisianist Strain, p.
Wesleyan University Press, 1979), 65; Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion and Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), 239-40; Kai T.
Theodore Dwight Bozeman offers a powerful and erudite alternative, but the law-wrought rigors of the "precisianist strain" are overdrawn, rendering Bozeman's precisianists too forgetful of Christ and his grace.
12) On the "precisianist" accents of Sibbes, Preston, and Cotton, see Theodore Dwight Bozeman, The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion and Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), 5-6, 108, 111, 140, 142 143, 152 n.
Theodore Dwight Bozeman attributes "an elaborate preoccupation with the self and its conflicted passage through a lifelong, often anxious venture of transformation, self-reproach, and -control" to the godly penitential program in The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion & Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), 72.
This cliched language bespeaks the psychopathologies of piety that Theodore Dwight Bozeman examines in The Precisianist Strain: Disciplinary Religion & Antinomian Backlash in Puritanism to 1638 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004), esp.
5) Indeed, one contention of the more forward among reformers, who came to embrace their colleagues' disparaging depictions of them as precisianists, purifiers, or puritans, was that "a worthy, grave man" need not be a priest to pronounce on Scripture.