Predeliberation


Also found in: Legal.

Pre`de`lib`er`a´tion


n.1.Previous deliberation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appealing to recent work in economics and epistemology, Talisse draws our attention to the phenomenon known as "group polarization," whereby "members of a deliberating group, predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies.
Group polarization is the tendency of individuals in deliberating groups to "predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies," (197) while choice shift refers to this same tendency as it manifests in the opinions and decisions of groups as collective entities.
An Empirical Evaluation of Predeliberation Discussions, 2009 U.
He argues that "members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies" (2001, 15).
More specifically, group polarization means that "members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies.
In brief, group polarization means that members of a deliberating group predictably move toward a more extreme point in the direction indicated by the members' predeliberation tendencies.
The foremost is the belief that jurors who engage in predeliberation discussions will prejudge the case before hearing all the evidence that is to be presented and instructions on the law.
The jury plurality rule stands for the proposition that the larger the predeliberation majority, the more likely it is that the final verdict will correspond to it.
After viewing the trial, jurors each filled out a brief form indicating their predeliberation vote.
275, 282 (1983) (finding that in predeliberation assessments, white jurors were more likely to attribute guilt to Hispanic defendants than Hispanic jurors, but finding no significant difference after deliberation).
T]he product of deliberative judgements may be far worse than the product of simply taking the median of predeliberation judgements" (Sunstein 2001, 42).