prefect

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pre·fect

 (prē′fĕkt′)
n.
1. A high administrative official or chief officer, as:
a. Any of several high military or civil officials in ancient Rome.
b. The chief of police of Paris, France.
c. A chief administrative official of a department of France.
d. The administrator in charge of discipline at a Jesuit school.
2. A student monitor or officer, especially in a private school.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praefectus, from past participle of praeficere, to place at the head of : prae-, pre- + facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

prefect

(ˈpriːfɛkt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in France, Italy, etc) the chief administrative officer in a department
2. (Law) (in France, etc) the head of a police force
3. (Education) Brit a schoolchild appointed to a position of limited power over his fellows
4. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) any of several magistrates or military commanders
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Also called: prefect apostolic an official having jurisdiction over a missionary district that has no ordinary
6. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church one of two senior masters in a Jesuit school or college (the prefect of studies and the prefect of discipline or first prefect)
7. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a cardinal in charge of a congregation of the Curia
Also (for senses 4–7): praefect
[C14: from Latin praefectus one put in charge, from praeficere to place in authority over, from prae before + facere to do, make]
prefectorial adj

pre•fect

(ˈpri fɛkt)

n.
1. a person appointed to any of various positions of authority or superintendence, as a chief magistrate in ancient Rome or the chief administrative official of a department of France or Italy.
2.
a. the dean of a Jesuit school.
b. a cardinal in charge of a congregation in the Curia Romana.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin praefectus, n. use of past participle of praeficere to put in charge =prae- pre- + -ficere, comb. form of facere to make, do1]
pre`fec•to′ri•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prefect - a chief officer or chief magistrateprefect - a chief officer or chief magistrate; "the prefect of Paris police"
administrator, executive - someone who manages a government agency or department
Translations
تِلْمِيذٌ مُفَوّضعَريف الصَّف، مُناظِر الدَّرْسمُوَظَّف إداري، والٍ
prefektstudent mající dozor
præfekt
valvojaoppilas
prefektusszenior
deildarstjóriumsjónarmaîur
監督生
반장
prefektasvyresnysis mokinys
klases vecākaisprefekts
prefektštudent majúci dozor
ordningsman
นักเรียนที่ดูแลควบคุมนักเรียนที่เด็กกว่า
başkanmülkî amiröğrenci temsilcisi

prefect

[ˈpriːfekt] N
1. (Brit) (Scol) → monitor(a) m/f
2. (Admin) (esp in France) → prefecto m

prefect

[ˈpriːfɛkt] n
(British) (in school) élève chargé de certaines fonctions de discipline
My sister's a prefect → Ma sœur est en dernière année et est chargée de maintenir la discipline.
(in France)préfet m

prefect

nPräfekt(in) m(f); (Brit Sch) → Aufsichtsschüler(in) m(f); form prefect (Sch) → ˜ Klassensprecher(in) m(f)

prefect

[ˈpriːfɛkt] n (Brit) (Scol) allievo delle classi superiori che è incaricato della disciplina e gode di alcuni privilegi (Admin) (in Italy, France) → prefetto

prefect

(ˈpriːfekt) noun
1. one of a number of senior pupils having special powers in a school etc.
2. in some countries, an administrative official.

prefect

تِلْمِيذٌ مُفَوّض prefekt præfekt Präfekt επιμελητής monitor valvojaoppilas délégué stariji učenik koji pazi na red i disciplinu prefetto 監督生 반장 prefect ordensmann prefekt monitor de escola старший ученик ordningsman นักเรียนที่ดูแลควบคุมนักเรียนที่เด็กกว่า başkan cựu học sinh trợ giúp giáo viên các công việc quản lý 级长
References in classic literature ?
This he did not possess for long, for two things made him hated and despised; the one, his having kept sheep in Thrace, which brought him into contempt (it being well known to all, and considered a great indignity by every one), and the other, his having at the accession to his dominions deferred going to Rome and taking possession of the imperial seat; he had also gained a reputation for the utmost ferocity by having, through his prefects in Rome and elsewhere in the empire, practised many cruelties, so that the whole world was moved to anger at the meanness of his birth and to fear at his barbarity.
Rabourdin, who said to himself: "A minister should have decision, should know public affairs, and direct their course," saw "Report" rampant throughout France, from the colonel to the marshal, from the commissary of police to the king, from the prefects to the ministers of state, from the Chamber to the courts.
Later, he had changed it himself, for he had found the name of Fernandez hated by prefects of police, jefes politicos, and rurales.
The chevalier assumed to know from the number of her capes in the wash how the love-affairs of the wife of the prefect were going on.
de Blacas moved suddenly towards the baron, but the fright of the courtier pleaded for the forbearance of the statesman; and besides, as matters were, it was much more to his advantage that the prefect of police should triumph over him than that he should humiliate the prefect.
At last, he announced that he was going to the prefect himself for information, and would let her know everything on the following Sunday, between eleven o'clock and midnight.
I know G , the Prefect of Police, and shall have no difficulty in obtaining the necessary permission.
Just a word from the ministry in Paris to the Prefect.
In the flourishing times of the Roman Empire, it was the ordinary station of the prefect of the eastern provinces; and many of the emperors of the queen city (among whom may be mentioned, especially, Verus and Valens) spent here the greater part of their time.
He had been given a latch-key by the prefect, the man who turned out the gas at a quarter past eleven, but afraid of being locked out he returned in good time; he had learned already the system of fines: you had to pay a shilling if you came in after eleven, and half a crown after a quarter past, and you were reported besides: if it happened three times you were dismissed.
de Beausset, prefect of the French Emperor's palace, arrived at Napoleon's quarters at Valuevo with Colonel Fabvier, the former from Paris and the latter from Madrid.
Granet lounged a little back in his chair, but though his air of indifference was prefect, a sickening foreboding was creeping in upon him.