preferential voting

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Related to Preference voting: Ranked ballot

preferential voting

n.
A system of voting in which the voter ranks candidates in order of preference.

preferential voting

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a system of voting in which the electors signify their choices, as of candidates, in order of preference
References in periodicals archive ?
But the Nats enjoyed a 23 per cent swing from Labour in first preference voting in the Falkirk seat that belonged to new MP John McNally, below.
Preference voting is like gay sex; the relevant political question was not whether a majority of the electorate wish to participate.
The alternative vote (AV - preference voting by 1,2,3 etc) which he derides, will ensure that in future no MP will be elected without the support of a majority of votes cast.
Preference voting would mean every vote would count and every MP would have to get a majority of votes cast - an end to "safe seats" and no more wasted votes.
He finds that there are both political and economic factors that vary with the context and milieu of elections, and he introduces six models of electoral choice--affirmative voting, party voting, economic voting, democratic preference voting, political referendum voting, and candidate voting.
An alternative approach might have increased the PERCEIVED BENEFIT, by reforming our electoral system to one of PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION or PREFERENCE VOTING, giving more of us a greater chance of influencing the outcome, either in our constituencies or nationally.
Why not do away with state-run primary elections altogether and apply preference voting to the general election?
With the preference voting system, it was hard for New Labour to paint Livingstone as a spoiler, especially when he urged his supporters to give Labour's Dobson their second preference.
For single-candidate offices, a system known as preference voting (also called the "instant runoff") could thwart Wonderland democracy Where three or more candidates ran for an office such as the presidency, the voter would be instructed to rank the candidates in order of preference.
Like all proportional systems, preference voting allows blocs of like minded voters to win representation in proportion to their voting strength.
The Irish parliament, Australian senate and non-partisan city council in Cambridge (MA) are elected by preference voting, which is based on voting for candidates rather than parties.