Premarin


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Related to Premarin: Provera

Prem·a·rin

 (prĕm′ə-rĭn′)
A trademark for a drug preparation of conjugated estrogens.

Prem•a•rin

(ˈprɛm ə rɪn)
Trademark. a brand name for a mixture of conjugated natural estrogens used chiefly for estrogen replacement therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The name of the medication, Premarin, came from its origins: PREgnant MARes' urINe.
Premarin, Prempro, and/or Premphase lowered cardiovascular, Alzheimers, and/or dementia risk; or
According to Schwartz, the US got hoodwinked into believing that synthetic hormones, like Premarin were the only way to treat menopause and other hormone imbalances when the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a massive nationwide research study, began in the 1990s.
Despite assurances from authorities about its bioequivalency in humans, I believe Premarin is good for postmenopausal mares, while for women, estradiol is more physiological.
The WHI trial did demonstrate an increase in breast cancer incidence in women treated with estrogen and progestogen, Premarin, and Provera.
What they may or may not realize is that the doctor-recommended Premarin comes from pregnant mare's urine, which seems more natural because we are more closely related to horses, which are at least other mammals, than we are to plants.
Between 2002 and 2004, profits from the overall Premarin family dropped 68%.
For example, we can expect bio-identical estradiol in topical form to have similar effects on breast cancer risk as Premarin, and bio-identical oral estradiol to have similar effects on stroke as shown by Premarin in the Women's Health Initiative hormone trials.
I WAS delighted to learn Premarin has had such a wonderful impact on your sex life.
During 2000, we purchased and relocated several Belgian and Percheron mares from the Premarin farms in North Dakota.
The alternative for the filly - and hundreds of other young horses and the mares bred to produce urine for the hormone replacement drug Premarin - was the slaughterhouse.
Back then, Joan Flynn, 66, of Hilton Head, SC, who had been taking Premarin for nearly 20 years, quit cold turkey, even though the study's findings were for Prempro, an entirely different medication.