fetal alcohol syndrome

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fetal alcohol syndrome

n. Abbr. FAS
A group of abnormalities occurring in an infant as a result of excessive alcohol consumption by a woman during pregnancy, including growth retardation, cranial, facial, or neural abnormalities, and developmental disabilities.

fetal alcohol syndrome

n
(Medicine) a condition in newborn babies caused by excessive intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy: characterized by various defects including mental retardation

fe′tal al′cohol syn`drome


n.
a variable cluster of birth defects caused by the mother's consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Abbr.: FAS
[1975–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fetal alcohol syndrome - a congenital medical condition in which body deformation occurs or facial development or mental ability is impaired because the mother drinks alcohol during pregnancy
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, achievement in numeracy, reading, spelling, and writing was not significantly impaired with low to moderate prenatal alcohol exposure.
1%) children and adolescents who met the criteria for a diagnosis within the fetal alcohol spectrum had never been diagnosed as affected by prenatal alcohol exposure.
Potential covariates considered in our models included examiner (two examiners were used); child age at examination, sex, race/ethnicity, birth year, birth weight, gestational age, school grade, peak blood lead level from ages 1 to 3 years; parental education at birth; household income at birth; OB risk score; HOME score at 8 years of age; and maternal parity, age at birth, race/ethnicity, birth place, marital status at birth, breastfeeding, prenatal smoking, prenatal alcohol, drug use in the year before birth, prenatal omega-3 consumption, prenatal fish consumption, IQ, and depression (modeled as continuous or categorical variables, as shown in Table 1).
Over 40 years of research conclusively links prenatal alcohol exposure to birth defects.
These results demonstrate that prenatal alcohol exposure can change how brain signaling develops during childhood and adolescence, long after the damaging effects of alcohol exposure in utero.
The most significant effects of prenatal alcohol exposure are on the developing brain that leads to cognitive and behavioral deficits in the fetus.
Prenatal alcohol and marijuana exposure: Effects on neuropsychological outcomes at 10 years.
In fact, the timing of prenatal alcohol exposure during fetal development is also a very important issue.
Despite the documented dangers of prenatal alcohol consumption, surveys consistently reveal that 1 in 10 pregnant women in the US report use of alcohol and an estimated 2 percent of pregnant women binge drink during the course of their pregnancy.
International Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Awareness Day, recognized every year on the ninth day of the ninth month, is an important reminder that prenatal alcohol exposure is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disorders in the United States.
Among their topics are gender-dependent effects of prenatal cocaine exposure, insights from an animal model into gender influences on the cognitive and emotional effects of prenatal cocaine exposure, sex-specific effects of prenatal marijuana exposure on neurodevelopment and behavior, sex differences on prenatal alcohol abuse in humans, and sexual differentiation of the human brain: hormonal control and effects of endocrine disruptors.