fetal alcohol syndrome

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fetal alcohol syndrome

n. Abbr. FAS
A group of abnormalities occurring in an infant as a result of excessive alcohol consumption by a woman during pregnancy, including growth retardation, cranial, facial, or neural abnormalities, and developmental disabilities.

fetal alcohol syndrome

n
(Medicine) a condition in newborn babies caused by excessive intake of alcohol by the mother during pregnancy: characterized by various defects including mental retardation

fe′tal al′cohol syn`drome


n.
a variable cluster of birth defects caused by the mother's consumption of alcohol during pregnancy. Abbr.: FAS
[1975–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fetal alcohol syndrome - a congenital medical condition in which body deformation occurs or facial development or mental ability is impaired because the mother drinks alcohol during pregnancy
syndrome - a pattern of symptoms indicative of some disease
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References in periodicals archive ?
In Canada, prenatal exposure to alcohol is a leading cause of preventable brain damage and birth defects.
Bell's willingness to read my book and to understand why I challenge our society to do everything in its power to prevent prenatal exposure to alcohol.
These defects of the brain and the body exist only because of prenatal exposure to alcohol and it's a leading cause of non-genetic learning disability in the UK.
Neurodevelopmental deficits among children who have confirmed prenatal exposure to alcohol but who do not meet diagnostic criteria for FASD (growth retardation, central nervous system impairment, and facial dysmorphology) are common.
Washington, Dec 04 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that prenatal exposure to alcohol severely disrupts major features of brain development that potentially lead to increased anxiety and poor motor function, conditions typical in humans with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD).
Prenatal exposure to alcohol and other drugs is the leading cause of preventable birth defects and intellectual disabilities in Nevada.
High prenatal exposure to alcohol has consistently been associated with adverse effects on neurodevelopment.
Alcohol research has made great strides toward understanding the causes and consequences of prenatal exposure to alcohol since its initial clinical description over three decades ago.
One of the leading researchers in the field of prenatal exposure to alcohol and illegal drugs, he has authored eight books.
Prenatal exposure to alcohol may have a persisting adverse effect on Sertoli cells, and thereby sperm concentration.
68), which the authors said was "consistent with the potential role of prenatal exposure to alcohol in the etiology of AML.