bedsore

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bed·sore

 (bĕd′sôr′)
n.
A pressure-induced ulceration of the skin occurring in persons confined to bed for long periods of time. Also called decubitus ulcer.

bedsore

(ˈbɛdˌsɔː)
n
(Pathology) the nontechnical name for decubitus ulcer

bed•sore

(ˈbɛdˌsɔr, -ˌsoʊr)

n.
a skin ulcer over a bony part of the body, caused by immobility and prolonged pressure, as in bedridden persons; decubitus ulcer. Also called pressure sore.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bedsore - a chronic ulcer of the skin caused by prolonged pressure on it (as in bedridden patients)
ulcer, ulceration - a circumscribed inflammatory and often suppurating lesion on the skin or an internal mucous surface resulting in necrosis of tissue
Translations

bedsore

[ˈbedsɔːʳ] Núlcera f de decúbito

bedsore

bed sore [ˈbɛdsɔːr] nescarre f

bedsore

[ˈbɛdˌsɔːʳ] npiaga da decubito

bed·sore

, bed sore
n. úlcera por decúbito.

bedsore

n úlcera de decúbito (form),úlcera por presión, llaga debida a permanecer mucho tiempo sentado o encamado sin cambiar de posición
References in periodicals archive ?
In the most serious cases, pressure sores can become infected and lead to blood poisoning, gangrene and even death.
NEARLY 1,000 people died in care homes in England and Wales because of dehydration, malnutrition, septicaemia, and pressure sores or ulcers in 2016.
Nomes and se EARLY 1,000 people died in care homes in England Wales because of dehydration, malnutrition, septicaemia, and pressure sores or ulcers in 2016.
2% 888 deaths in 2003 in people aged over 65 888 deaths in 2010 in people aged over 65 10,945 people died because of a fall 65+ 7% 600 984 people died because of pressure sores 0.
The pensioner ended up emaciated and suffering with pressure sores before being admitted to hospital, where he died in 2013.
Contract notice: Provision of devices for transfer, Positioning and prevention of pressure sores.
Objective: Pressure sores occur in bedridden patients in intensive care units, clinics, and even at their own places.
Sheila Barker, a retired secretary and mother of two daughters, suffered for months with agonising pressure sores on both heels and elsewhere on her body.
Hundreds of thousands of people develop pressure sores each year while in hospital or private nursing care.
Pressure sores are painful and debilitating and, if untreated, can cause serious injury and even death.
Ideally, the best way to deal with pressure sores is to avoid them.
FIRE Betsi Cadwaladr Health Board saw a "significant rise" in the number of hospitalacquired pressure sores last year and may struggle to breakeven financially in the next 12 months, says a new report.