P-wave

(redirected from Pressure waves)
Related to Pressure waves: compression wave

P-wave

 (pē′wāv′)
n.
A seismic wave that travels very quickly through the earth, causing the rocks it passes through to change in volume and their particles to vibrate parallel to the direction of wave propagation. P-waves can travel through solids, liquids, and gases.

[P(rimary) wave, since it is the first type of wave to be detected by a seismograph after a seismic event.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Equipment consisting of both compression garments and compressors produces pressure waves that facilitate circulation and prevent swelling caused by circulation problems.
A team of scientists, led by Alberto Carpinteri of the Politecnico di Torino in Italy, believe that high-frequency pressure waves generated in the Earth's crust during this earthquake may have produced significant neutron emissions that may have interacted directly with nitrogen atoms in the linen fibers, inducing chemical reactions that created the distinctive face image on the shroud, LiveScience reported.
Then, as pressure builds and a strong jet of steam escapes through the lid's opening small vortices of steam break off and create pressure waves in the air that we hear as a high-pitched whistle, Ross Henrywood and Anurag Agarwal report in the October Physics of Fluids.
Pressure profiles from the negative pressure waves generated by the small yet abrupt pressure changes from closing the valves were captured at both LDS.
The skulls, made of fused bone plates, might have evolved in a way that makes them flexible in the face of pressure waves and resistant to breaking, she said.
Acoustic Wave Therapy utilizes pressure waves that impact both of the major causes of cellulite: fibrous septae and protrusion of fat into the lower dermis.
Unlike ultrasonic meters, this flowmeter measures pressure waves at lower frequencies and does not send a signal through the flow.
Equipment consisting of both compression garments and compressors produces pressure waves that facilitates the circulation and prevent swelling caused by circulation problems.
When mammals hear a sound, first, airborne pressure waves thump against the eardrum.
The researchers experimented with zinc oxide, a common piezoelectric material, to see how well it converts vibrations from sound and pressure waves into energy to power a phone.
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