presupposition

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pre·sup·pose

 (prē′sə-pōz′)
tr.v. pre·sup·posed, pre·sup·pos·ing, pre·sup·pos·es
1. To believe or suppose in advance: "In passing moral judgments ... we presuppose that a man's actions, and hence also his being a good or a bad man, are in his power" (Leo Strauss).
2. To require or involve necessarily as an antecedent condition: "The term tax relief ... presupposes a conceptual metaphor: Taxes are an affliction" (George Lakoff).

pre·sup′po·si′tion (prē-sŭp′ə-zĭsh′ən) n.
pre·sup′po·si′tion·al adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presupposition - the act of presupposing; a supposition made prior to having knowledge (as for the purpose of argument)
supposal, supposition - the cognitive process of supposing

presupposition

noun assumption, theory, belief, premise, hypothesis, presumption, preconception, supposition, preconceived idea the presupposition that human life must be sustained for as long as possible

presupposition

noun
Something taken to be true without proof:
Translations

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃən] Npresuposición f

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃən] nprésupposé m
the presupposition that ... → le présupposé selon lequel ...pre-tax [ˌpriːˈtæks] adj [earnings, losses, profits] → avant impôt(s)pre-teen preteen [ˌpriːˈtiːn]
npréadolescent(e) m/f
adjpréadolescent(e)
pre-teen children → les préadolescents

presupposition

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃn] npresupposto
References in classic literature ?
It has been often remarked that Descartes, having begun by dismissing all presuppositions, introduces several: he passes almost at once from scepticism to dogmatism.
The Squire had been used to parish homage all his life, used to the presupposition that his family, his tankards, and everything that was his, were the oldest and best; and as he never associated with any gentry higher than himself, his opinion was not disturbed by comparison.
As far as I have been able to divine the latent meaning of the objectors, it seems to originate in a presupposition that the people will be disinclined to the exercise of federal authority in any matter of an internal nature.
This appreciation of time-intervals is, however, obviously a product of memory, not a presupposition of it.
At the meeting, Larijani criticized that Westerners are trying to impose their beliefs about human rights, which are based on their own presuppositions, on other countries.
The intention in this paper is to proffer a tentative explanation of the strength of the commitment to education about the environment in terms of taken-for-granted presuppositions about teaching and curriculum.
English travelers and explorers, the meaning of geography to society and the ways it was used to maintain and reflect power and privilege, and in which it reflected the preoccupations of the society of which it was a product are all players in this fascinating and revealing meditation on history, geography, and cultural presuppositions.
However, he is not an uncritical guide, and he raises numerous questions concerning the cogency of some of Frege's technical apparatus, on the one hand, and of his philosophical presuppositions and commitments, on the other.
This legitimating practice brought into suspension the presuppositions of unquestioned truth and offered, in its stead, critique, including immanent critique.
The linguistic presuppositions for this study are drawn out of the writer's/Mwalimu Isaacs's topics in the text examined.
For any proposal we make, Hegel would say, there are always unstated presuppositions without which it cannot stand.
I SEE that the presuppositions of Professor Boyle of Manchester University keep being rehashed in news reports (ECHO &BBC regional news: January, April and August).